Numero Uno

Hi All,

Cheers to everyone that took the time to trek here to the new incarnation of Serendipity Farm in a blog. It’s starting to feel a bit like Dr. Who around here with all of the swapping and changing bodies. Sanctuary is a lot like a Tardis so I suppose its easy to draw that conclusion. Well here we are back where it all started at WordPress.com all over again. Why? Well we talked about it and decided that as neither of us have decided to embrace a career in web design and so springing for another (much more expensive) year of hosting seemed a bit of a waste of money to be honest when there was a free blog hosting platform that I could utilise to share what we are doing here on Serendipity Farm with whoever was interested.

Grass in the gutter and a small eucalyptus tree
Welcome to Serendipity Farm where even the gutters have trees…

What can you expect here? Well we have decided to plant lots of edibles so far this year. We have planted Dragon fruit (one of the cuttings is sprouting!), lychees, tropical paw-paw’s and recently I found the remains of some pink gooseberries that I had been given ages ago in the fridge. We won’t talk about what kind of a state they were in (back of the fridge syndrome) but needless to say they were ladled out into some potting mix and fingers crossed there were enough seeds left, amidst all of that mould, to have a go at growing them from seed.

A potato seed pod
I have harvested this potato seed pod and am going to have to work out what to do with it now.

I am most interested in growing edibles from seed and will be pursuing it in earnest this year. I am going to see if I can get hold of all sorts of unusual things as I want to see if I can grow them and if they will adapt to our climate here in Northern Tasmania. The top secret hush-hush project that will see Sanctuary completely renovated over the winter period and running a completely new and exciting series of permaculture systems in the Spring, Summer period of 2016-2017 is about to get started.

Avocado seedling
This avocado seedling, that grew from an ancient compost heap, now has a little brother growing close to it as well as a neighbour about a metre away. I have been reading Jackie French’s book “Backyard Self-Sufficiency” that Stevie-boy bought for me recently, and in it, she says that you can grow avocado trees a metre apart and keep them clipped as an edible tall hedge!

It’s cooling down nicely here and after Steve and I lay waste to the front acre over the next week or so, we are going to start on the project. We have almost a month off from TAFE, thanks to a fortuitous conglomeration of circumstances and public holidays this year, and we are going to make the most of it before what is promising to be a very cold winter settles over us.

Chinese lucky or money plant
This is what’s known as a Chinese lucky (aka money) plant (Pilea peperomioides). I got it from TAFE years ago when a glasshouse renovation was being undertaken as a tiny piece of discarded plant. As you can see, it grows like topsy and has emerged from every hole in this pot. I will divide them all up and start them in new pots of their own. You can never have enough Chinese luck, or money in my opinion 😉

I will be sharing all of the exciting things that we are about to do with you all and again, thank you to my dear constant readers who have followed me through thick and thin. Hopefully this will be the last move for a few years and “welcome to the new blog” 🙂

Raspberries
Whilst these raspberries are long gone (as are the rats that ate them…) there are still a few stray raspberries on the shrubs as well as a crazy branch of our cherry tree that thinks it’s spring and has flowered and set fruit at the beginning of autumn.
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53 Comments Add yours

  1. Lissa says:

    Lovely 🙂 Can’t wait.

    I’ve never figured out the finer points of blogging on WordPress. A friend set mine up for me. Sometimes it takes me ages just to find where I post my blog. One day….

    Excitement! the dragonfruit is shooting. It likes it there! Did I tell you this variety is the hardiest out of all of them and self pollinates. Many of my gardening friends poo-poo it in favour of more difficult to grow varieties but I just love them. Let’s hope it crops for you eventually.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      It must like it here as it is shooting (one cuttings so far). I have them in pots in the glasshouse and we have had lovely warm days up till now (cold today, delightfully so 🙂 ). WordPress is easy peasy. They do all of the work for you and all you have to do is load up your images, write your post, add a few tags and press “Publish”. They will even share it to Facebook for you if you like.

      Like

  2. brymnsons says:

    Welcome back 👍😀. Nice money plant. I wonder if you rub the leaves it brings you luck 😉. X

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I think it’s more the plant that is lucky to be honest as this one was on it’s way to the tip when I got it 😉

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Lissa says:

      Why do all the WordPress blogs I read look so different from each other? There must be tricks of the trade setting up the way you want your own to look.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. narf7 says:

        It depends on the theme that you pick. You go to WordPress and look at the themes and pick the one that you want. There is also WordPress.com and WordPress.org to confuse the matter even more. WordPress.org allows you to do everything yourself but you have to host the block on another server (than WordPress) where WordPress.com is hosted, free and easy peasy. That’s why I am back 😉

        Like

  3. Found, followed, hopefully you’ll pop up in the email regularly. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. narf7 says:

      Now we are both on WordPress.com I will be easy to find now. I just have to make sure I don’t fill up my blog with photos too quickly won’t I? 😉

      Like

      1. Yes! I’m three years in and not full yet – I wonder how long I’ve got……

        Liked by 1 person

      2. narf7 says:

        Mine was full in three years (the first one) but that was because I blogged every day for the first year and used a LOT of images. “Fool me once…” et al

        Like

      3. Live and learn! 🙂

        Like

  4. missmaudy says:

    I’ve found you and popped you in ma feedly! You’re just like one of my besties – she had an entire page dedicated to her frequent changes of address!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Good on you Miss M. I can use all of the happy dear constant readers I can get 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. foodnstuff says:

    Hooray! Scrolling with the mouse works again!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      A new and different template 😉

      Like

  6. Welcome back! Looking good ms narf ☺

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      It looks like all of my wonderful ladies have been able to find me. I am most pleased 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Jane says:

    I’m glad you didn’t give up blogging. I look forward to reading about your new project. I wish you rain. Still haven’t had any here. Only the forecast of a dry April.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Same here. Dry dry DRY. Lucky we are about to make those waterwise changes for next growing season really. Did you take a note of the new blog address? This one will just disappear in a few days and it will be like it never existed at all.

      Like

  8. Hurrah! I’m so glad you are back here… somehow I really didn’t entirely get to grips with following your self-hosted blog… my bad. Hopefully all will be back as before now 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Glad to see you back. Now I just have to populate my new blog with something worth reading 😉

      Like

      1. and, of course, some lovely photos!

        Like

  9. Jane says:

    Yes, l have the WordPress address bookmarked. I don’t want to lose you now before you show us the new project, or even after as I’m sure each blog will be so good.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Thank you Jane 🙂

      Like

  10. Robbie says:

    Oh, I am so envious-paw paw:-) They are native here in my state and I can’t find one place to squeeze one in on our proprety. I have two very large trees pushing 100 and a bunch of dwarf fruit trees. No place for paw paw…I look forward to hearing all about your adventures. I put in some aronia, elderberry, a peach and some more blackberries…..love that fruit. I hope I can find you again…have to get off and get some stuff done….I will be back!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      You could always just bookmark my blog? The paw-paw I am talking about is a tropical fruit. I would love to try growing your native paw-paw. It would have a better chance of growing well here as it likes it a bit colder than the paw-paw I am trying to grow. I just need to get hold of some native American paw-paw seed now. Dwarf fruit trees are the go on a smaller property and have you ever thought about trees that have multiple grafts on them? You can have many kinds of fruit (so long as you graft like with like so citrus on citrus (lime, orange, lemon etc.) stone fruit with stone fruit (apricots, peach etc.) and multiple varieties of the same kind i.e. lots of different apples can be grafted onto the same rootstock) could be another great (and easy) way to increase the variety in your garden without increasing the need for space?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Robbie says:

        I need to do that! Our native paw paw is tough to get going for it does not like sun the first few years, but needs sun later..I had no place I could find that would provide that:-( Oh well, can’t have everything when you live on smaller city lots. I agree, the dwarf and grafted are made for us city dwellers. I put a peach tree in this spring-I am so excited!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. narf7 says:

        I would love to get hold of some pawpaw seeds to have a go at growing them here. I wonder if they would like living in Tasmania? 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Robbie says:

        you never know until you try:-)

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Robbie says:

        I did read they are an understory tree for the first few year if you try them then they love full-sun. I just can’t find a space to squeeze them in on our lot. I have two large old trees that dominate and have to use more shallow rooted bushes. I added dwarf fruit trees a few years ago, so I am stuffed to the brim! I do know they grow wild in our woods, so I may have to get out and hunt them down:-)

        Liked by 1 person

      5. narf7 says:

        If you do manage to get hold of some seed, let me know. I will pay you postage for a few :). Have you ever thought of multi grafting some of your dwarf rootstock trees to get more bang for your buck? I am not sure what kind you have but you can graft like with like (so plums with plums, citrus with citrus, apples with apples etc.) and get a wider variety of fruit from the same tree. Grafting isn’t hard, you just need to find some scion (grafting material from another tree) to have a go. If you already know how to graft please disregard what I just said but multi grafting is a really great way to increase the variety whilst keeping the same amount of use of your space 🙂

        Like

  11. Lovely to welcome you back to WP.. Now I will not miss your updates hopefully as often she says 🙂 .. Loved the first offering Fran.. and so pleased I didn’t arrive at your previous blog too late not to catch this link.. 🙂
    Looking forward to being able to see your replies in my Notification reader lol 🙂
    Happy Easter 🙂 to you xxx
    Sue

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      It will be a lot easier to keep in touch with everyone now and a whole lot less work 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes 🙂 Big smiles it is.. :-p) and love your new logo too xxx

        Liked by 1 person

      2. narf7 says:

        Much easier to make a decent logo when you know how to use Illustrator and Photoshop. We learned how to use them well last year 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Clever you… 🙂 all was well worth it 🙂 Have a great new day.. must be early dawn there now 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Joanna says:

    ah, there you are 🙂 Happy Easter/Autumn xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Ditto Ms Joanna. I am back with WordPress.com 🙂

      Like

  13. wordpress.com is absolutely fine I reckon. Anything that gives you more time to do other things, or simply doesn’t take time away is ok in my book. Good to see you back Dr Narf and I say hooray to new permaculture growings and changes…always exciting! I’m contemplating a banana circle this week…hmmm.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I just read Milkwoods post about how you got all down and dirty with compost and went to the dark and geeky compost side. I must admit, when we were turning huge piles of it when we were indentured horticultural student slaves not so long back, it wasn’t my favourite thing to get all over my socks but now that we are applying it to our own lives (and our garden) there is SO much to get excited about. I am the experimenting kind of person and am experimenting with making compost mounds where I want to plant things on our (shite) soil. I find that if I get a circle of weldmesh and heap up compost components and let them rot down (I don’t turn it, I just let it fester), it gets full of wormy activity and turns the soil (such as it is…) beneath this pile to easy dig (easy to get rocks out of ) wondrous material that Steve doesn’t have to invent new swear words just to get his shovel into. Permaculture has been my saviour and if that makes me a geek. “Bring it ON!” I say. Welcome to the geek fold. We all float down here 😉

      Like

      1. ahhh, you crack me up woman. Good to be here in the geeky fold…floating or not.
        Yep, crap soil is a major component here too. So much of it to ‘fix’! I’m always up for a challenge though and when you start with a crap ornamental souless garden, the only way forward is up, so anything I do is an improvement. Set my bees up this morning…bit bloody exciting.

        Like

  14. As long as you keep on blogging, I don’t care if your platform is polished to a professional shine or merely handwritten and scanned notes uploaded to social media. I happen to think that your new virtual home is quite handsome, however, and not a step down in the least. I’m still a big fan of WordPress too. Welcome home! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I have to say, the S.E.O. is MUCH better here. No sooner did I land back than I got 2 new followers and I have only one (pathetic) blog post. After a year of languishing in the boon docks I am back with bells on ;). Cheers for that gorgeous image by the way (Easter egg) 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Lrong says:

    Dragon fruits… hmmm, would be wonderful if I can grow it here in Japan… I’d probably need a glasshouse for that…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Tasmania gets pretty cold too. Apparently they will grow well up against the brickwork of a house. I have my cuttings in pots in the glasshouse but I plan on finding nice micro climates for them so that they can grow in my garden next year. I know they grow well in Melbourne Australia which is just over the water from us so I am going to give it a go :).

      Like

  16. Welcome back to the WordPress fold, Fran!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Yay, At last I have found your new blog. I made a mess of saving the link to your new blog and Google had never heard of ‘serendipityrevisited’. I remembered you often commented on the posts of the Contented Crafter so I have reconnected through there. Your new blog is now bookmarked.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      It’s a lot easier when you are with WordPress.com and I am actually glad I came back to this format. Glad you could find me and I have done the very same thing to re-find blogs that I have lost in the ether 🙂

      Like

  18. Littlesundog says:

    Aha!! I found you!! See, I was so far behind reading that I didn’t know you’d moved back to WordPress. I’m kind of proud of myself for hunting you down.I did it the easy way – I found you on Margaret’s blog and the link took me here. I’m “following” you now so I’ll be a regular again.

    I’m always flabbergasted to think you’re inching towards winter, when the intense inferno heat is just around the corner for us. Are you ready to stoke up Brunhilda and have you fluffed up Earl and Bezial’s beds with extra blankets?? 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      We just lit Brunhilda for the very first time this year last night. I have a kettle tapping away (with the stone in it so you know it is boiling) on her at the moment and Bezial is right next to her on the couch. Earl is upside down in our bed snoring so won’t be near her till he mosey’s out in about 2 hours. Margaret found my blog through Pauline’s blog so you are doing what she did. You should all be amateur detectives! 😉 Welcome back 🙂

      Like

  19. Finn Holding says:

    Lovely looking blog Fran, you’ve done a great job putting this together.I’m going to camp out here for a while and enjoy it!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Namita says:

    Hello Fran, I was desperately searching for your blog and never found it. I did not know how to get in touch with you. Then I went back to your comment in my blog post and reached here. I am awestruck. This is so beautiful! Hope you are well and enjoying life in your farm. I have to take out time and read all your posts one by one.
    Take care, love and good wishes!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Namita I am SO happy that you found me! I can’t comment on your blog posts because of some discrepancy between Blogger and WordPress and was so sorry to read about the passing of your dad. I know how he was the cornerstone of your family. I will keep trying to post comments but if I miss a comment to your posts please know that I am unable to comment at the moment. BIG hugs to you and your family 🙂

      Like

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