The joy you can find in a broken fridge.

Hi All,

Well I am back for another swing, much like my fellow compatriots ACDC. My “swing” involves more fridge wicking and some photos to share with you of the state of Serendipity Farm of late. The long damp winter that we are still being influenced by (more rain today as I type this) has meant that the garden is a den of fecundity and the weeds are as high as a dinosaurs eye. They completely overtook the elephant around about June and don’t show any signs of ceasing their growth spurt any day soon.

The front garden down from the deck
A photo of the front garden through the deck rails but if you look a bit harder you might just spot someone visiting…
Herman the echidna has returned for the spring and is hoovering up his weights worth of ants and slaters. He should be too fat to move soon if the sheer volume of both types of insect that are scurrying around Serendipity Farm are any indication.
Herman the echidna has returned for the spring and is hoovering up his weights worth of ants and slaters. He should be too fat to move soon if the sheer volume of both types of insect that are scurrying around Serendipity Farm are any indication.
Christmas booze
Check out some of our Christmas booze that we picked up recently for $2 a bottle. It looks like it is going to be a very “merry” Christmas this year down here on the river. You might want to stay away for the duration πŸ˜‰

Steve and I have been beavering away in order to get our assessment packages finalised for handing in to our lecturer so that we can get this “pass” grade rolling. Last year I realised that I really knew sweet buggery-bollocks all about coding websites and decided to come back this year, with what I had already learned, and see if I could do a better job. I am really glad that I decided to suck up my failure to grasp HTML and CSS and return to the fold as this year I got it. I even made another website completely for uploading and handing in my assessment material so once I upload it to my lecturers computer I can hand it over to him and wait and see if there is anything more that he requires and fingers crossed, both Steve and I will pass and move on to George the Wunderkind’s class where we already have visions of sugarplum fairies gyrating in our heads with ideas for what we are going to attempt to produce for a short documentary each and a short drama each.

If anyone would like to check out the two websites that I have built recently I would be most happy to get any feedback at all, especially if you spot something wrong. The first link is for a local friend who has decided to start her own small business minding chooks, dogs, cats, birds etc. at your own home while you are away or on holidays.

http://holidayfarmhands.com/

The second link is my final assessment website that I created for next years lecturer George. He is an Audio Post Production Specialist and as someone who didn’t even know what “foley” was prior to taking on this task, I had a bit of background study to do prior to working on this site. Please feel free to let me know what you think of it and if you find any anomalys in either site.

http://sonicsolutions.biz/

dacelo_novaeguineae_waterworks-tasmanian
I didn’t take this photo but it’s open source as well as Tasmanian. This is a good representation of one of our local kookaburras. They have decided that Serendipity Farm is a pretty good place to breed exponentially as there is a surplus of cheese fed other birds, eggs, lizards and other tasty morsels just waiting to be predated by their kith and kin. I used this image as I never seem to be able to catch a good photo of any of the kookaburras that call our property home so this is the best alternative.
Low tide with mirror perfect water on the Tamar River
Low tide with mirror reflective water on the Tamar River taken from our front deck
Adventitious ferns next to the water tank
Adventitious ferns next to the water tank

We are now sitting back twiddling our collective thumbs with the most precious commodity of all on our hands…time. I have been hooking up a storm as not only did I find some scrumptious patterns for bears and floppy rabbit toys but Dr Phil (Ms Twisted) from the esteemed and most enlightening and entertaining blog “The Twisted Yarn” sent me the most innovative book for how to make hooky monsters. I am enthralled simply by how many mix and match monsters are possible and will be hooking up a storm of brightly coloured, over the top cute and crazy monsters to drop off to our local hospital for children who are sick over Christmas. I can’t think of anything worse for a child to be in hospital over the Christmas period and thanks to Dr Phil, there will be some seriously bright and demented critters to weather the storm and hopefully give them someone to make their troubles a little less troublesome.

Here’s a delicious pattern for a selection of different sized crocheted teddy bears with proper pukka names. Who couldn’t resist “Harvey, Mike and Lewis?”

http://nurturingfibres.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Harvey-Mike-Lewis.pdf

And even though a good friend said that the following pattern looked like “demented sock monkey’s” I am guessing that there are some of you who would quite love to hook a demented sock monkey for their very own so behold, Dixie, Maddie and Lulu for your gustatory delight…

http://nurturingfibres.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Dixie-Maddie-Lulu.pdf

Now back to the wicking beds. I jumped the gun a bit and headed out and bought some veggie seedlings. I am champing at the bit to get them into the fridge wickers but completely underestimated the tag team of rainy weather and steep slopes and the sheer unmitigated difficulty in relocating our soil stockpile from the back of a now junglescent Sanctuary down to where our fridge wickers are nestled all tastefully level and ready to get wicking. By the time Steve and I have pushed the barrow up our steep slope, shoveled a barrow full of damp mix, after first hauling out Scotch thistles taller than I am (note, removing your t-shirt and using it as a rudimentary glove because you just can’t remember to bring a glove up to haul them out isn’t anywhere near as pain free as actually remembering that glove…) and having to work standing on one leg as the other one is busy shooing eager roosters and hens who would invade Sanctuary and wreak their own particular form of destruction whilst shoveling and then trying not to skate down the wet slope with a loaded barrow and negotiating the gate under the watchful gaze of a most interested Earl who thinks he has finally figured out how to escape if we only get tired enough to forget to shut the gate and you are starting to get the picture.

Water wicking fridges in situ
The wicking bed empire of the future (well some of it. I am sure I will want more…) all lined up and nice and level (NOT an easy thing to do) taken from next to the water tank.
Water wicking fridges all lined up ready to fill
And this is the view taken from down next to the gate (the opposite direction)
Adventitious potatoes harvested from this pot.
This decent selection of spuds in the bottom of this very large black pot grew from an adventitious spud that hitchhiked a lift from Sanctuary to our front deck in a shovel full of soil and these are the tasty results.

Despite the rain and the slopes and the determined dogs and the chooks from hades, we managed to fill quarter of the wicking beds and will be attempting to have half of them completed by tomorrow. My little plants are as excited as the worms that just got relocated to burrow down into the delicious damp dark soil mix that Glad’s oak leaves and the trailer loads of aged horse manure that we get each year from a most happy horse owner turned into. I have also been burying my food scraps in the 4 wicking beds that we have already filled for the worms to enjoy at their leisure. This wicking bed lark is great fun and it certainly makes you sleep well.

Bezial meditation (scratching his back on a blackberry) next to the last of our potted babies.
Bezial meditation (scratching his back on a blackberry) next to the last of our potted babies.
A little Seaside Daisy growing in the water tank base.
A little Seaside Daisy growing in the water tank base.
Hedgerow cranesbill
Hedgerow cranesbill next to the water tank. It’s a common garden weed around here but it’s pretty so I am letting it stay for now. Β I just identified this weed from a most delightful U.K. blog that I am about to add to my RSS Feed Reader. Sometimes you come across a blog that you know you will click with and this is just such a blog. Check out “Bug Woman – Adventures in London”Β 

In between filling wicking beds and madly completing our assessment work we have been taking long walks with the dogs in a wide variety of interesting places. I took some photos on a recent walk that I took with Earl and will share them below, along with some photos of Serendipity Farm looking vaguely attractive. Don’t get used to that view. It doesn’t last long! Anyway, less blah-blah-blah from me and more nice quiet photos of what narf, Steve, Earl and Bezial have been up to since we last chatted. I hope your neck of the woods isn’t too cold, too hot or too stressful. I thought I might share a short YouTube video with you of Earl, on our spare bed, bursting some of his birthday balloons. He is officially 6 years old now. Over the next few weeks we will be finishing off filling the wicking beds (with soil, not plants yet) and then we will hurl ourselves into the construction of a sort of fully netted poly-tunnel type structure to protect the fecund fridge wickers from the equally fecund possums. We will also be irrigating Sanctuary and planting out some of the fruit trees and nut trees that have been stuck in pots for WAY too long in the process. I plan on sharing the processes with you all here so until then, “Catch-ya later Alligator.”

Steve and Bezial meandering along Paper Beach on a recent dog walk
Steve and Bezial meandering along Paper Beach on a recent dog walk
Earl guarding a prospective bird scaring device.
Earl guarding a prospective bird scaring device.
A celebration in fecundity and hope for the future.
A celebration in fecundity and hope for the future.
Fridge wicker filled with mixed lettuce seedlings.
This is one of the fridge wickers filled with mixed lettuce seedlings. The freezer section is now the home of our turmeric tubers.
Some of our veggie futures.
Some of our veggie futures.
More veggie futures
More veggie futures and one of the BIGGEST veggie pests I have ever seen attempting to predate one of the tomatoes!
Native pig face aka Carpobrotus edulis
Native pig face aka Carpobrotus edulis loaded with local bees.
Bezial contemplating just how deep he is willing to go into the water...
Bezial contemplating just how deep he is willing to go into the water…apparently it isn’t very far.
Paper Beach dog walk
Paper Beach is a lovely place to walk a dog. You can let them off (if they aren’t prone to running away, wreaking havoc and NEVER returning…I am looking at YOU Earl…) and at this moment in time it’s stunning from all angles.
A study in pigface and driftwood.
A study in pigface and driftwood.
Another relative of pigface
Another relative of pigface but this one is much smaller and from a distance, appeared to be a large shrub. It was growing on a fence.
Paper Beach again
Paper Beach again. This time, it was on the part of the walk where I get to be dragged behind a most excited Earl while Bezial pretends he is driving in a sports car through Paris with the wind in his hair in the front seat of the car being driven to the beach.
Tidal line
Earls favourite place on the beach. Every dog has pee’d here and this is where I realise that I will never need to go to a gym to work my biceps again…
Paper Beach is magic in Spring.
Paper Beach is magic in Spring.
Earl's trail
Earl’s trail
More of Earl's trail
More of Earl’s trail. The walk (drag in my case) is about 3km. I walk it with Earl and Bezial drives to the actual beach with Steve as he says he is a bit past walking that far but he does get to go to the old mill with Steve, a special treat off lead. Earl can’t go ANYWHERE off lead. note the tension on the lead in both of these images. I rest my case!
Little mussel shells on the beach.
Little mussel shells on the beach. Note an off leash Bezial coming to see why I am laying prostrate on the ground (stupidly)
Small apple tree in a bramble hedge
This is the ONLY stand of blackberries that I allow to flourish inside our house fence-line. The reason I allow this is that it is completely protecting the small apple tree that it encircles from the marauding guzzling apple adoring possums who would strip it bare in no time without it’s feral cousin.
Sheer neglect and what I am insisting on calling a "Hedgerow" in our side garden.
Sheer neglect and what I am insisting on calling a “Hedgerow” in our side garden.
More "Hedgerow". The chooks favourite place to hide from the marauding kookaburra's.
More “Hedgerow”. The chooks favourite place to hide from the marauding kookaburra’s.
The view from the gate at the far side of the fridge wickers.
The view from the gate at the far side of the fridge wickers looking down towards Glad’s place next door. That bright green Liquidambar on the left hand side gets scoffed by the possums every year. They haven’t set upon it yet as they haven’t finished with “everything else” quite yet…
One man (Steve) mowed this meadow with his dog.
One man (Steve) mowed this meadow with his dog. Well, the dog was barking from a distance and “mow” was actually whipper snip but you get the picture πŸ˜‰
Tadpoles!
We managed to carefully rehouse all of the tiny tadpoles that were swimming around in one of the fridge wickers. They are now much bigger and incredibly happy in their new home and feasting on all of the insects and leaves that drop down from the bramble and honeysuckle hedge that shelters their “pond” from the sun.
Rhododendron, loquat and oak tree all competing for space inside the relative safety of the house fence.
Rhododendron, loquat and oak tree all competing for space inside the relative safety of the house fence.
Earl standing in between two fridge wickers "investigating"
Earl standing in between two fridge wickers “investigating”
Earl says bollocks to standing in the middle, may as well jump into the fridge wickers and have a good sniff (and steal sticks while you are at it...)
Earl says bollocks to standing in the middle, may as well jump into the fridge wickers and have a good sniff (and steal sticks while you are at it…)
The driveway just down from the house after Steve whipper snipped it and you can just make out my neatly raked piles of twigs and leaves that we used to fill the fridge wickers once we barrowed them around to the other side of the house.
The driveway just down from the house after Steve whipper snipped it and you can just make out my neatly raked piles of twigs and leaves that we used to fill the fridge wickers once we barrowed them around to the other side of the house.
The piles are now inside the fridge wickers and the driveway looks reasonably neat for once.
The piles are now inside the fridge wickers and the driveway looks reasonably neat for once. I love being able to multitask and find new ways to use what would otherwise be burned. The raked leaves and twigs are now inside the base of the fridge wickers and the driveway is tidy again. A win win situation for all πŸ™‚
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30 Comments Add yours

  1. Hi Fran, I’ll leave this before continuing on with reading the rest of the post.

    Pet minder service: The photos are great and so is the layout. The blurb though says ‘we’ all the way through to end when it becomes ‘I’ – it needs to be consistent one way or t’other. I’d like to know something about the person/people offering this service. Who are they, what experience do they have, there needs to be a hook that reassures me my boys would be in good hands ………….. Maybe some photos of them interacting with pets?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Good point. I will change the “I” to “we” and when I made the site, my client didn’t have a lot to give me. As the business was completely new (I don’t even think that she had a client yet by that point) I didn’t have images so I went with what I had (not a lot ;)). As we live nearby she can update me with some images and you are right, people want to know that the person that they are leaving their house and precious babies with is safe and that they will care for your pets in the manner to which they have become accustomed. “I” know that my client is amazing with animals but the site is a bit generic. I just changed all of the “I’s” for “we’s”. Cheers for your excellent feedback πŸ™‚

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  2. Gosh the sonic solutions offering looks pretty good to me – most professional!! The only thing I found difficult was the about me page was a little difficult to read because of the white light arcing through the writing. It might just be tired eyes though! You’ve gotten very clever at these techie things Missus – good on you!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      That is a valuable piece of feedback right there Ms Pauline! It’s important to test your sites on a wide range of people and I might have to do something about that selection of text now. I have been told by another tester that it’s a bit too long (the bio bit) and I am guessing, if I shortened it a bit and made the text larger, it would be less of a visibility problem. Thank you SO much for your feedback and it’s great knowing how to build websites now :).

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  3. Everything is looking most beautiful over there in Tassie – and the wicked fridges are a triumph! Earl popping balloons was highly enjoyable to watch too. A most full and interesting catch up on life down on the farm! Now I’m going to go get ready for bed, night, night!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I hope you had a good sleep and dreamed of sugar plum fairies rather than Earl jumping up and down on your spare bed eating your aspidistra’s! πŸ˜‰

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  4. You’ve both been so busy ! I do hope you never have to move…imagine shifting all those fridges πŸ˜€ Really looking forward to see the results of your using them to grow your crops. My fave photo today is that stunning view from your deck of the Tamar.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      We are lucky buggers aren’t we? I don’t foresee us ever moving from here but if we ever do, best of luck to the person who inherits those fridge wickers. I dare say they will outlast me and I will be bollocksed if I move even one of them! πŸ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Joanna says:

    Lovely read and photos – it all seems to be evolving amazingly – those fridges!!! Xx jo

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Genius or insanity, either way, those fridges are here to stay πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  6. foodnstuff says:

    Just want to say I love all the photos and especially Paper Beach. Lovely spot to have right on your doorstep. I will check out those websites when I have more time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Cheers Bev πŸ™‚

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  7. Fantastic post. I loved all of the photographs – you have been so busy! I’m becoming more in love with Earl with every post. I know I couldn’t handle him but he is a really brilliant dog. Hope he never escapes πŸ˜ƒ

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Earl is probably the closest that I will ever get to a “wild” dog. We bought him from a breeder on the mainland in South Australia when he was 17 weeks old and he had been raised in a large collective of other dogs so knew the rules and how to behave with other dogs instinctively. Apparently the dogs didn’t have a lot to do with people much and Earl had only had 2 “walks” on a lead before he flew in to Tassie in a crate. It took me a fair bit of time to warm to him as he was a very stubborn dog and learned very quickly that he had landed on his feet and that life was sweet on Serendipity Farm. It’s now 6 years on and I wouldn’t be without Earl. He is my little mate who comes up and nudges me to have a cuddle. He is an amazing clown who loves to make us laugh and who constantly amazes me with his antics and how clever he is. He has taught me to live in the moment and I don’t think I would fit through the door if I didn’t have to walk him ever day. Ditto on the “escapes” but we have a fence around the house enclosure (for Earl, Bezial never wanders and we could leave the gate open and he would stay here) and Earl doesn’t do “jump” so we are very lucky. I think Earl is one of those “naughty boys” that we women love to secretly adore. He’s handsome, full of bravado, absolutely in love with his family (and every other dog in the neighbourhood) and has taught me more about myself than I would ever have credited possible. I have some more photos taken yesterday of Earl being “Earl” that I will include in my next blog post. To say he is “full of character” would be an understatement of the highest order πŸ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Wonderful response. Thanks for more information about Earl. I could possibly start his fan club….

        Liked by 1 person

      2. narf7 says:

        I think he already has one πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

  8. brymnsons says:

    Serendipity is looking pretty Fran. I hope the rain hasn’t washed too much away… We have 37 degrees in Perth today, so I think that translates as bloody hot for us too. Love Earl and the balloons :). Lovely photos too… one day we will be back to walk on Paper Beach again x. I’m looking at doing a smaller version of your fridges, but I might be moving again so I will wait and do it at the new place.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I saw large rectangular tubs at Office works (with lids) for $5 each. At the time I thought “these would be perfect for water wicking boxes”. Might be worth a look-see as you can pack your stuff in them for moving and then reuse the “boxes” for wicking beds. Multi-tasking πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. brymnsons says:

        Thanks Fran I will take a look see πŸ™‚

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  9. foodnstuff says:

    Hi Fran, I’ve had a look at your website efforts and I must say I’m impressed. I was salivating over that gorgeous bevy of chooks when they were whipped away from me and replaced by a dog! But they came back and I think the opening is great! Yes, I do agree with the person who said she’d like to see some pics of the person providing the pet minding service. Sounds like a good service….I hope they make a go of it.

    The sonic solutions one is not so colourful….maybe that’s what he wanted or maybe SS’s aren’t that pretty! Yes, the white streak in the about me section is a bit disconcerting and if you took it out you’d have to make sure that phone number in red stood out enough from the background, which it wouldn’t do without the white behind it. I think I’d like to see more colour in it all the same. The contrast with the pet minding one is so stark. Otherwise well done. I can’t imagine how much effort goes into doing that. I have enough trouble with my blog and that’s all been done for me via the template…all I have to do is type…the lazy blogger’s way.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I agree with you completely, That’s why I went back to WordPress.com as it’s SO easy to do! Now I know what you have to do to produce a “from scratch” website, I will never complain again about good old WordPress πŸ˜‰

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  10. Oh wow, I had never seen an echidna before, even in photos! What a wild world it is out there… So kind of you to share your space with your fellow, and in turn, this little guy with all the rest of us.

    I’m absolutely in love with those photos of Earl. What a lovable character! Glad you have a helper to inspect all the goods and make sure everything’s in proper order. πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      In my next blog post we had a record (again) rainfall period and everything flooded and Earl was “helping” the rain on our wheelbarrow so we took a photo ;). Like we NEED anymore rain at the moment! πŸ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Hi Fran, I have enjoyed reading your recent posts about life on Serendipity Farm. Congratulations on a rewarding year of study. I can see you are preparing for a busy summer with your plans for revamping Sanctuary as well as establishing your new vegetable empire protected by netting. Hopefully the rats won’t be able to be as free with the new food growing arrangements.
    I am envious that you have a visiting echidna.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Herman (the echidna) comes and goes and we see him bumbling around in various sections of the garden. The feral cats don’t bother him (they aren’t stupid) and he hasn’t got anything else to compete with his love of ants and the sheer capacity of our property to produce ant species for the slurping. Glad to see you back Margaret and best of luck to the rats as the new fridge wicking empire is right next to the fence where the feral cats patrol…

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  12. Wow Fran.. everything is looking so good… πŸ™‚ And it isn’t until you see all of those fridges lined up you get the scale of all that hauling about you have done..
    I pressed both links to your creations of websites and was impressed with both.. Love the idea of those coming to animal sit and such an aray they do too.. Loved the pictures πŸ™‚ And the music one too .. There is so much now on the technical side to everything..

    loved the pictures of earl and I spied Stevie peeping through the plants too.. My Hubby said that Beer was a good bargain.. I don’t know how your beer prices compare lol.. Hubby said our specialty beers run around Β£1-80 a bottle.. and down to about Β£1-25 each when you buy a pack of four.
    And you have to get your Christmas priorities in order don’t you LOL
    I hope Summer is settling down now to more warmer weather and not so much of the rain..
    Looking at the river photo its a good thing you are set high up with the amount of rain you had over winter..

    here in the UK again we have had unusual storms that have dumped huge amounts of rainfall in one go on us. Causing more floods.. We had a bit of nightmare as we collected our granddaughter from school and had to pass through flooded roads.. Thankfully our 4×4 got us through but lots of cars stalled and broke down..

    And isn’t nature wonderful. All those tadpoles … Glad you found them a permanent home .. Love our little frogs in our pond.. they so help keep the slugs down.. πŸ™‚

    Looking forward to Saturday when you said there was an update..

    love and Hugs and I so enjoyed my visit.. xxx Love Sue ❀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Hi Sue. I had a bit of a laugh thinking about our tiny frogs trying to quaff a whole leopard slug. The local frogs around here are about the size of half of your pinkie finger and the leopard slugs are about 4 times bigger! The only good thing about leopard slugs is that although they do help themselves to some of your veggies, they also help themselves to other slugs. They are carnivorous! We have all sorts of little birds flitting around the fridge wicking beds that we have situated around the house and keeping the insect population very scarce as it’s breeding season here and aside from the cheese cubes that we put out on our kitchen window ledge, our chooks do a sterling job of scoffing anything that dares to hop or scuttle or leap around out there so the birds get the trees and inside our house compound. It’s lucky you have a 4 x 4! I know that we were lucky to get through flood water on our way to TAFE a few times in winter. Our soil is still damp here and it’s almost summer. Most of the rest of Australia is complaining about how dry it has been and we are yet to commence watering and in a week it’s summer! We have been racing around installing irrigation in Sanctuary, hurriedly filling fridge wicking beds and walking the dogs and by the time the afternoon hits we are totally knackered. Steve is going to pick up a punnet of specialty lettuces that we ordered from a small local nursery (can’t get them anywhere else) and walk Earl for me as Bezial and I are having a day off walking today but we will both be up in Sanctuary planting out cherry, fig, and whatever else we can lug over to the new espalier beds. At the moment we are planting them out (hazelnuts and currants are all in!) and not worrying about espalier. That can start when most of them lose their leaves in winter and we can see their shape/form better. Steve is our resident espalier expert. Everything on the peripherals of Sanctuary has gone mental. We are shipping off tonnes of thornless youngberries and loganberries to our local community gardens so that everyone can have some as they dived in and out of the garden beds all over the place last year. This year Sanctuary will have structure and “we” will have veggies. We are going to outsmart the rats and get what we actually want to get from dividing up the gardens and I get to plant out my poor potted edibles, some of which have been languishing in pots for years now. If I wasn’t permanently knackered at the moment I would be ecstatic! πŸ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Wow! no wonder you are both Knackered Lol.. I am out of puff just reading.. Great idea about the thornless young berries and loganberries to share them.. And those leopard slugs sound gross Lol.. We were inundated this year with huge brown slugs.. Not as big as yours by the sound of it.. But some I saw got to 6 inches long… Sorry I still work in inches instead of cms.. in my head… πŸ™‚
        Love the sound of Hazelnuts… I would go Hazelnut picking often with my Dad at the end of Sept.. And we kept it up even when we we all grown up.. And took our children to the same spots.. πŸ™‚ Nothing nicer than a young sweet hazelnut in salt πŸ™‚ I would spend hours cracking the shells to get a small handfull of nuts That brings back fond memories.. πŸ™‚
        Love the sound of what you are doing with Sanctuary and it is showing too in your photo’s… And yes the ‘Longtails’ will get outsmarted lol xxx πŸ™‚ Hope you manage to catch your breath over the weekend. Big hugs your way ..
        Love Sue πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Linne says:

    Loved the post and especially the pictures. Earl is quite funny with his balloons, isn’t he? I am drooling over your wicking beds AND the thought of your nut and berry farm. Big hugs.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      My nut farm is in infancy and won’t produce for about 7 years but at least I have them in the ground now. I gave away a lovely walnut tree but I had nowhere to put it that the possums wouldn’t do severe damage to it. The wicking beds are going great guns. Better than I could have imagined to be honest. Now that our weather has warmed up a bit and we are getting lovely sunny days, the veggie seedlings are taking off like racehorses and it’s amazing to see how green the beds are getting. We might even get some tomatoes this year! When we were remodeling Sanctuary, I remembered a grape vine that I planted a couple of years ago. It was a red seedless grape and it got overrun by the mad youngberries (that now have their tendrils everywhere!) and I assumed that it was dead as I hadn’t seen it grow at all. I rootled around where I thought that I planted it and found it. The poor thing was stunted to the max but after digging it up and transplanting it into a wicking bed (we are going to let it grow over the and droop grapes down into the wicking structure that we are currently building) it has decided that it wants to live and has started producing lots of leaves. This food gardening lark is very rewarding :). Big hugs right back atcha Linne πŸ™‚

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