Summer has finally landed

Hi All,

Well it’s been another busy fortnight or so here on Serendipity Farm. Steve and I have been working hard to get everything sorted out in the garden and our latest task was to build a structure around the fridge wicking beds to protect the veggies inside them from possum attack. So far, the possums have stayed away from the planted beds. We put that down to the fact that the seedlings are pretty small for a possum to want to try to navigate those strange white structures for but as soon as they start growing, the possums interest value is going to increase exponential to the rate of growth so we have a small window of opportunity before disaster strikes.

Fully enclose possum proof garden in Sidmouth Tasmania
This is a shot of the side of Sanctuary that connects with the side of the old shed. Why am I showing you this image? Check the next imageΒ and all will become clear…
Squeak our sky chook
Meet Squeak.
Squeak the sky chicken and her babies
We couldn’t find Squeak, the baby chick that we hand reared last year who is now a hefty hen and figured that she was sitting on eggs somewhere. We were unable to find her and that’s hardly surprising as she was nesting up on top of Sanctuary! Earl was looking curiously up at the netting and I thought he was bird watching. There are baby chicks all over the place here at the moment so hearing more of them didn’t set my alarm bells off.
Baby chicks
Here are Squeaks “Sky Chickens”. They were hunkered down about 9ft up in the air. I had NO idea how we were going to get them down and just put food and water up there till we could work out how to catch them all and transport them to safety.
Squeak the sky chicken has landed
After sharing Squeaks story on Facebook, a number of people said that she would fly down and bring her chicks with her. I was skeptical to say the least but I was wrong. Here she is dust bathing with her chicks.
Gratuitous chicken and hen shot
Here’s another photo of Squeak and her babies on terra firma. She was laying eggs on top of a wardrobe in Steve’s shed. We should have known that she was inclined to lay up high. Now we know we will be sure to look vertically rather than just horizontally next time she goes missing!

As middle aged penniless student permaculture hippies, we try to do everything we can to minimise the cost of anything that we build. We try to use permaculture principles to use what we have available and what is abundant on the property and in the area around us. In order to build a structure for the fridge wicking beds, we need a lot of timber and as we have a large stand of ti trees (Melaleuca alternifolia) on our property, we figured we would head down and utilise some of this free bounty in our structure. The main problem with having to find your own resources is that they don’t come prepacked and ready to go. In order to utilise the ti trees, we had to head down into the forget-me-not and vinca infested section of the property and go hunting for trees that were of a suitable size for our needs.

Melaleuca alternifolia ti trees
This is a small selection of ti trees in part of the lower section of our property. As you can see, some of them are quite thin and it will do the rest of them good for us to thin a few of them out and let a bit more light into this area.
Chainsawing trees to use as poles
Steve removing the tops of the trees so that we can collect the trunks to use as poles in our structure.
Arty shot of some collected ti tree poles
Just some of the trees we collected to create our structure. We needed 18 poles at 2.3 metres for the sides and 18 poles at 2.7 metres for the width and more poles for making doors (when we get around to it tomorrow)
Collected ti tree poles on wheelbarrow
This wheelbarrow deserves a medal for going above and beyond the call of duty. The things that we have made this wheelbarrow do are mind boggling. This time it is transporting all of these poles up to where we need to strip the bark from them to turn them from trees to poles.
Steep hill for a heavy load
A birds eye view of the slope we have to trundle the barrow up to get to where we have the fridge wickers. We only had to stop once…

After we found the right sized trees we had to cut them down and then find a way to transport them back to the house. Our wonderful old 4 x 4 is on it’s last legs and although we managed to use it to carry some of the ti trees that we needed for our structure back up to the house, we didn’t want to chance it breaking down on the driveway so we had to come up with an alternative method for transporting the cut timber from the lower part of the property to where we have the fridge wickers. We ended up strapping the cut timber to our trusty (rusty) wheelbarrow and Steve pushed and I pulled it up the steep slope to where we had set up our saw horses so that we could start preparing the trees to become poles for our structure.

Poles ready to strip the bark from
Our trusty home made saw horses are ready and raring to go!
Draw knife
This is a draw knife. We were given this knife by a friend who had 2. This double handed knife is a perfect example of old tools working better than new ones. It can strip a tree trunk of bark in no time.
Using the draw knife
Using the draw knife.
Bonus mulch
The bonus for all of my hard work stripping the bark is this lovely ti tree bark mulch
Mulch pile
I raked up the first pile of bark and got this much mulch for the garden. I have since used it inside Sanctuary to mulch a row of currants and part of a row of hazelnut trees.
Stripped poles
This is how the poles look once they have been stripped of their bark. Perfect for creating rustic frameworks for repelling possum invaders.

Turning the trees into poles involved using a a draw knife to strip the bark from the trees. If you leave the bark on the poles they rot. If you remove the bark, they last forever. Go figure! Anyway, as Steve does most of the really heavy stuff around here, whenever I can do something I take on the task so I stripped all of the trees ready to cut to the right lengths to create frames for the structure. The added bonus of stripping the bark is that I got the bark to use as mulch in Sanctuary. I also got a serious upper body workout for free.

The beginning of installing the frames
On the first day we managed to build and erect 4 frames before we ran out of usable poles. The front frame has extra poles and wood on it for adding a door.
Steve and frames
Steve is channeling his inner wild bushman at the moment. This was taken at the end of the first days framing.
Compost tumbler
Steve whipper snipped an elderly friends 2 acres of fence line for her recently and aside from her thanks, she offered him this compost tumbler if he wanted it. He sure did! “Herman” is now living happily on Serendipity Farm and aside from having his delicious contents removed this morning in order to move him to another spot (we foolishly put him where we were going to build our framed structure) has settled in nicely on Serendipity Farm.
Apricot kombucha
This is a tall cold glass of apricot kombucha. The apricots came from a huge windfall of fruit that one of our lecturers gave us last year. I ate an enormous amount fresh but ended up pureeing most of them and storing them in our freezer in ice cream containers. I thought that I had used them all but when I was hunting for something in the freezer recently I discovered a 4 litre container of them. After defrosting it I used it to second ferment my kombucha. It tastes delicious and was perfect to celebrate the end of the first days hard framing.

Once we stripped and cut the poles we started making the frames for the structure. We worked out that the structure would need a front and a back with doors in each, and a series of frames in between the fridges in order to share the load of the ex fish farm netting that we are going to use to cover the entire structure. We used this netting on Sanctuary and it is perfect for the job and we have a couple of large rolls of it left so we are using what we have available. As we have 14 fridge wickers in the row we ended up putting a frame between every second fridge wicker and we ended up needing 9 frames in total (including the front and the back)

Steve and the frames
This photo was taken from the other direction at the beginning of day 2 of framing. We had collected and stripped all of the poles we needed and were ready to start making frames. Here you can see Steve and Herman (who has since moved) and our row of 14 fridge wickers that the framing is going to enclose.
Steve patting the dogs
Steve preparing himself for the hard work ahead.
Empty barrow and more ti tree mulch
The barrow is now empty and I have another load (that still needs raking up) of ti tree mulch to apply to a row of espalier fruit trees inside Sanctuary.
Day 2 poles stripped and ready to go
Here are the poles we collected on day 2 with our wheelbarrow, stripped and ready to go. The poles in the background are going to be used for making doors as they are too thin to use for the main structural frames.
Snail on the window
I just had to share this photo of a snail on our kitchen window. Steve had just cleaned it so that we could actually see through it and this cheeky cephalopod decided to take the chance to be the very first to leave his mark…sigh…

We managed to collect and strip poles on the first day. We then constructed 4 frames on day 2 and on day 3 we headed back down and collected more trees for poles and created the rest of the frames. Another excellent thing (although it doesn’t feel like it at the time!) about doing things yourself, is that you learn on your feet. The first frame took a lot longer than the subsequent frames as we had to learn how we were going to put it together. By the last few frames we were like well oiled machines. There are some serious benefits to doing as much as you can yourself and one of them is that you learn a whole lot in the process, including learning that you can do things you didn’t think that you could.

Completed framing
It took 5 hours from collecting the trees to finishing the 5 remaining frames needed but we finally finished!
Earl and the structure
Earl has claimed it accordingly.
The dogs and Steve
We were most happy to finish up yesterday and take a well earned break. The dogs aren’t too sure about this new intrusion in their yard but Earl has marked every pole in order to claim it for the pack.
Home grown harvested artichokes
Another excellent benefit to growing things yourself is that you can grow what you like to eat. I love globe artichokes and love the plants almost as much as eating the buds. We have plenty of room here on Serendipity Farm for these excellent value plants. They grow without additional water, they produce a copious quantity of chokes and you can pick them when you like to get the perfect size. Here’s my first harvest from the plant in the front garden. I have since planted out another 5 plants inside Sanctuary (at the ends of the espalier rows) so hopefully I will be able to preserve a large amount for us next year.
Annies Artichokes
A lovely friend gave me a bag full of small artichokes that she was given recently. She doesn’t like them so its a solid “SCORE!” for me. I cooked them all and after eating the bases of all of the leaves I preserved the small chokes ready for this years Christmas table.

We have now installed all of the frames ready for putting on the netting and after a trip to the city some time this week, we will pick up some thin rope to finish the job. Once the netting is over the structure we can start work on installing the irrigation around the orchard trees that we have been adding to the small collective of trees that were here when we moved in. We had to cut down an ancient cherry tree this morning because something had killed it. We used the pole of the tree to strap a tall bird bath on for the birds in the area to safely drink and bath. We chopped up the old tree with our secateurs and a saw and will use it’s remains in one of the remaining wicking beds that we are still to transport down from Sanctuary. Nothing gets wasted around here.

Oca in a fridge wicker
I am guessing I am going to get a really good crop of oca this year judging on the foliage that my planted out harvested oca from pots last year are putting on.
Fridge wicker with tomatoes and lettuce
This is one of the second lot of fridge wickers that we planted out. As you can see, the cherry tomatoes are growing well and the lettuces underneath them put on extra growth every day.
Leaf lettuce in fridge wicker
Here are some of the mixed lettuce seedlings growing like crazy in a fridge wicking bed (blueberry shrub in the background).
Home grown harvested lettuce leaves
Our first harvest of lettuce from the fridge wickers for a salad for Steve last week.
Steve's chickpeas and rice
Steve watched a documentary called “Forks over knives” and has decided to stop eating meat. Here is one of his recent creations using some leftover cooked rice, chickpeas, sauces and spices. It tasted wonderful.
Sauteed mushroom and hummus wraps
Here’s another one of his creations. Sauteed garlic mushroom wraps with homemade red pepper hummus and salad. He has also given up drinking, thus the glass of juice to go with it.
Looking at our fridge wickers through the gate
The next time you see this structure it will be fully enclosed in netting. Watch this space…

In between all of the construction we have been moving a lot of things around, cleaning and clearing up and generally changing things to suit us better. I was happy to read that one of the fundamentals of permaculture is that you keep changing and adapting to the situation. We have been actively embracing that ethos on Serendipity Farm. I am officially knackered. Another benefit to doing everything you can yourself is that you sleep like a babyΒ and that’s my segue for Narf signing off for another lovely day down on Serendipity Farm. I will make sure to keep you all up to date on what we have been getting up to here. With Christmas rapidly approaching we will actually have some garden produce on our table this year which will make all of this mad rush of activity well worth it. See you all soon πŸ™‚

Early morning yacht and water shot with mist on the Tamar River in Sidmouth
I took my trusty old camera on one of my early morning jaunts with Earl and got this misty morning photo on the water.
Franks boat
Our irascible next door neighbour Frank used to be a tug boat captain in the neighbouring town of Beauty Point. When he retired he bought a yacht but sold it a few years ago to buy this large boat. I think he bought it to escape the sounds of roosters crowing but I managed to get a shot of it (me hidden behind a lamp post so as not to be seen πŸ˜‰ ) on my early morning walk with Earl.
Espalier fruit trees
I took my camera with me on my early morning dog walk so that I could see if I could get a shot of the espalier fruit trees on the property just down the road from us. This was one of the best shots that I managed to get. Sorry it isn’t better but my clandestine photography certificate is still a LONG way from being ticked off…
Espalier fruit trees and rock cairn
This shot shows the espalier rows a bit closer. The owner has covered the trees to protect them from blackbird attack (probably the group living in our eaves πŸ˜‰ ) but you can also see how he has cleverly used rocks collected from his soil to make corner posts for his fence.
Blackbird nest with babies
Meet the new family that has moved into the house. Well technically they don’t live “in” the house, they live in the roof guttering out the back. This clever blackbird knows that there isn’t anywhere safer to raise her babies than right next to the back door where the “beast” lives. No self respecting cat is going to chance meeting the beast and not only is she safe from predators (the beast excluded of course!) but she is just around the corner from the cheese feast that never ends. She has 4 babies and should be able to raise all 4 of them on the cheese mines on the kitchen window ;).
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31 Comments Add yours

  1. I do so enjoy reading about your adventures Fran! What a fabulous job you are doing – Just as I was wondering how you sustain the energy required you mentioned Steve’s new take on food and drink – good on him!! The two of you will live to a long, healthy, if penniless old age! (Just don’t lean over that compost maker and breathe in – I know someone who did that and who then nearly expired from what was eventually diagnosed as Legionnaires Disease.) All the stuff growing in your wicked fridges looks remarkably healthy, certainly worth all your hard slog! The tale of Squeak is hilarious – and that she flew her chicks down when she was ready – what a sensible bird!! This could be a book – you would write that up in your spare time of course πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Thankyou Ms Pauline. We certainly are leading a very busy and full life at the moment. To tell the truth, we are looking forward to having a bit of a break after we finish it all but we are honestly enjoying the results of the hard slog. I certainly won’t be sniffing Herman’s contents any day soon after reading that! I had to decamp his inner machinations into the wheelbarrow prior to moving his rotund carcass around to its new resting place and after looking at what he was digesting, I think the urge to sniff is low (ewww!) Squeak is most industrious and Bolshevist. Would we expect anything less of anything that lived on Serendipity Farm? πŸ˜‰ Hopefully that netting goes up reasonably easily and I can get a few images up here for everyone to see prior to Christmas rocking up. It has rocketed here this year hasn’t it?

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      1. I am still living in early October, apparently there has been some kind of wibbly-wobbly-timey-wimey -thing going on in my neck of the woods……. Christmas will be lucky to put in appearance next March at my rate! And I admire Squeak even more now πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      2. narf7 says:

        It’s still lovely and cool here most days. The rest of Australia appears to be drying out and heating up alarmingly but for now we Taswegians appear to have been forgotten. Fingers crossed it stays that way or I might just have to move to N.Z.!

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      3. We remain alarmingly wet, interspersed with the odd extra hot day just to keep our hopes up! It is odd, odd, odd weather and the only way I know Christmas is coming is the mad behaviour on the roads…… I might have to go bush!!

        Liked by 1 person

      4. narf7 says:

        We downloaded an extension for Facebook called “FB Purity” which dumps all of the advertising and news feed (on the left hand side) so we have NO idea what is going on and it’s blissful. We are beavering away in the garden and with no kids or newspapers or radio to constantly remind us that it is almost Christmas, we appear to have managed to escape most of Decembers rush out here in the bush. There are only a couple of weeks left! Lucky we are doing a lovely simple but delicious Christmas this year. We still haven’t put up our tree yet! Good idea to go bush. I am sure you would find a LOT of other people hiding out there away from the madness.

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  2. Well done to Steve…not sure I could manage giving up the vino but good luck! And those poles are little individual works of art πŸ˜€

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I think the word “rustic” was invented for us specially πŸ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

  3. foodnstuff says:

    Well done! I have Melaleuca ericifolia (Swamp Paperbark) here…a local species and similar to yours. Puts up suckers everywhere and produces the same sort of truncky clumps. I’ve been harvesting them for similar exploits. I made a frame to grow climbing beans on with mine and I’m just looking at the possibility of laying long rows of trunks to make an edge for a hugel bed.. Aren’t we clever permies?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I don’t believe that there is much more satisfying a venture, than using what you have to get what you want. πŸ™‚

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  4. aFrankAngle says:

    Happy summer to you … and it’s been damn cold here. I don’t know where to start with this post, but I loved your self-description as “middle aged penniless student permaculture hippies.”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      To quote an old colloquial Aussie phrase, since we finished TAFE we have been “flat out like a lizard drinking”. We haven’t stopped as we know that this lovely cool damp situation is an anomaly and that in the blink of an eye, it’s going to get very dry, very fast around here so we had to build our fridge wicking city, erect a possum proof barrier, get everything that we had in pots either in the ground (and drip irrigated) or gone and irrigate the heck out of everything else that we didn’t want to die. Suddenly Christmas has appeared and we need to take a short break from our maddening pace to give thanks and take a bit of a rest and then we are right back on that old work horse. This is our “holiday” period but we are busier than we are all year. Good to see you Mr Frank and the description is only the half of it!

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      1. aFrankAngle says:

        I know the two of you work hard … so do what you have to do … but don’t be a stranger! πŸ˜‰ After all, I remember what you taught me about the map of Tasmania! πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

      2. narf7 says:

        I do believe that was Ms A. Palmer who taught you that πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

      3. aFrankAngle says:

        Oh no … you aren’t getting off so easy … well, at least you shared the music vid. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Hi Fran, I am impressed by the size of the protective structure for the wicking beds. I was looking at the photographs and couldn’t see what was stopping the individual frames from falling over. Is there bracing in the roof area or on the sides?
    If Steve is no longer drinking alcoholic beverages, what happens to your Christmas stash featured in a photograph in a recent post?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      We already drank the Christmas stash so no problems there πŸ˜‰ The structure is a series of ti tree frames that are bolted onto the fence on one side and held in place by star pickets banged into the heavy clay soil we have here and drilled onto the star pickets on the other side. We also have two lengths of metal plastic covered clothes line strung along the length of the structure pulling it all tight and the netting is also anchoring the structure together as we added it in sections and each sections is anchored between two frames. It all stays up remarkably well πŸ™‚ Have a lovely Christmas Margaret and thank you for following my blog πŸ™‚

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  6. Good Heavens Fran, That structure should withstand the ravages of a cyclone!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Here’s hoping we never get one down this far Margaret! πŸ™‚

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  7. Oh my goodness, your little chicks are just the cutest fuzz balls ever! Hope they don’t give you too much trouble- I’m always hearing about “urban chickens” raising a ruckus around here or sneaking around fences and into traffic. Quite a different environment, no doubt.

    And I must say… Apricot kombucha is kind of blowing my mind right now. It seems so simple and obvious in hindsight, but I never considered it before. I must try it!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Apricot booch was absolutely delicious. We live on 4 acres out in the bush and our neighbours have large properties as well. Our 94 year old next door neighbour adores our chickens and loves it when the rooster brings them to her property to visit. Not so sure how Frank feels about them but as they stay away from his property, I guess it doesn’t matter too much ;).

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  8. This whole enterprise is a credit to you both Fran.. The work and effort that has gone into this project is unbelievable.. I was showing my hubby just the amount of work you guys have put in.. πŸ™‚ He was well impressed. πŸ™‚
    Loved the update about Squeak seems she turned out to be the perfect Mum. πŸ™‚ lol.
    That apricot Kumbucha looked just the thing to quench a good thirst on a hot day for sure.. πŸ™‚
    Everything is looking great and I know as you alter bits here and there, clearing out you will get things just as you want them..
    Your Tomatoes and lettuce looking good companions and those artichokes look yummy..

    Sending you Lots of Love and I so enjoyed the photo’s.. I said to hubby cutting down your own wood beats going to a wood yard buying 2×4 pieces of wood.. πŸ™‚ The results look wonderful.
    Have a great rest of your Summer Fran.. I have to update my gardening blog.. I’ve not been feeling up to blogging properly for a few weeks, And not been visiting regular..
    Hoping to get back into the swing now I feel a bit better..
    Lots of Love to you..
    And sending you all the very best for a Wonderful Happy Peaceful abundant 2017.
    Sue xxx ❀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      It’s so easy to get a bit depressed when it’s cold and dark. I never really got the “closing down for winter” thing till we moved here. Watching the leaves fall from the trees and the cold weather settle in is a reminder that we should be slowing down a bit and enjoying that quieter time between the mad rush of Spring for everything to get started all over again. I love winter. I think I might start limiting my exposure to social media this year. I do believe that it is starting to get very invasive and I think it might be time for me to start using the public library more. The wood isn’t very straight as we have to rely on finding tall saplings that are not too kinked but that adds to the rustic look and feel of the garden. I love being able to walk inside and know that it is protected from the possums but the birds can still get in to visit and to eat the insects that feel like a bit of a munch. I am SO glad that I decided to build those few little veggie gardens back in 2012 when my mum died. She had always said “make a few veggie gardens and at least have a compost pile”. I always balked but when she died I did it to honour her and suddenly I realised why she was impelling me to do it. You get such a connection with the earth when you garden. You get a sense of incredible satisfaction when you are able to take something from a small seed, watch it grow into something that you can actually consume, and know that you are eating something that truly nourishes your mind, body and soul. Making compost, watching the birds and frogs and lizards (and dogs πŸ˜‰ ) all interact together to get the most out of the small space, the improved soil, the trees that you are planting is soul healing work. We were irrigating a small area of the little orchard that we have planted inside the fence around our house area and overturned a large rock that I had placed next to one of the young loquat trees we planted out last year along the fence line. We found a couple of small skinks (lizards) with 3 eggs under the rock so when we rolled it back, we were very careful to place a couple of smaller rocks under the big rock so as not to squash the lizards or their egg (that they were protecting). You learn to care about what happens to other creatures when you garden. You learn that we are all related, that we have to all work together to make it work and so much more that I actually feel incredibly blessed and lucky to have learned this from my mother and her death actually was the catalyst for my own deep understanding of something fundamental that we all need. Our hands in the soil, our faces turned to the sun, our lives dedicated to simple things that give us so much more than we could ever understand. Gardening is magic for the soul. Winter is the perfect time to start planning all of your new adventures in the garden next year. I am going to stop focussing on things that I can’t change and start being proactive about what I “can” change. I think that’s where happiness can be found. In knowing that what you can change is vital work for healing us, our communities and our world. Big hugs Ms Sue and don’t despair or give up. Life is amazing and it’s our job to see the good bits and hold them up to shine and show other people to give them hope as well πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dearest Fran, What a beautiful response dear friend.. I couldn’t agree with you more about that connection with our gardens.. It becomes part of you and it breathes life into you.. Often I have felt depleted and low in spirit.. And I take myself off to the allotments and weed, get absorbed in looking at the small insects and how they manage to thrive.. Turning the soil over to think of the complexity of worms which break it all up and add life to it.. Nature is Amazing.. and she just keeps on Giving.
        I am excited this year as my daughter as part of her Christmas present to her Dad and myself bought us Two tickets to The Royal Horticultural Flower Show which this year is being held at Chatsworth House.. https://www.rhs.org.uk/shows-events/rhs-chatsworth-flower-show

        Its Our old haunt where in the grounds we spent most of our courting days πŸ™‚ And we often spend days out in the gardens there.. wandering their magnificent Park.. So I am really excited to be going .. For the 3 day event and we have tickets on the first day.. πŸ™‚ ..
        So Loved this reply of yours.. It was very poetic.. Re read what you have written.. πŸ™‚
        Love and Hugs and I am so pleased you started your garden too.. πŸ™‚ And I am sure your Mum is well proud.. πŸ™‚
        Love Sue xx

        Liked by 1 person

      2. narf7 says:

        That is one of the most amazing gifts that a daughter could give her parents. It goes to show that she really knows you both well and what you would love. I can’t wait to read about your exploits when you go and I am just about as excited as you are! πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      3. πŸ™‚ You will have to wait until June.. LOL.. counting down πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      4. narf7 says:

        I will have to mark it on my calendar (when I get one! πŸ˜‰ )

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Here is amazing website.. https://beachhousekitchen.com/

        And his Cookbook is Peace and Parsnips.. πŸ™‚ A link to his Book
        http://thehappyfoodie.co.uk/books/peace-and-parsnips

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Seriously, though, HOW do the two of you achieve so much? You must work so friggin’ day. I love the way that Sanctuary is constantly evolving.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Cheers Ms T. The rest of our property is an overgrown jungle and our fastidious neighbour Frank needs therapy.

      Liked by 1 person

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