Snow and hot water bottles in November

Hi All,

Well it’s official. It’s winter again apparently. Last night we had minus 2C and we both needed hot water bottles and Earl and Bezial needed their blankets again. I did hear that there was a sizable chunk of iceberg floating around off the coast of Macquarie Island which is pretty close to Tasmania as the crow flies so maybe that’s got something to do with it but for whatever reason, our days are sunny but it’s cold inside and we have resorted to blankets and hot water bottles in the middle of the day.

Full moon photo at 9pm
It’s a bit grainy but not bad for no additional light at 9pm. The moon is lovely at the moment ๐Ÿ™‚
7pm shot of the moon in the river
This is a slightly earlier 7pm shot of the moon in the river. As you can see it’s quite lovely at the moment.
Earl investigating the garden
Earl investigating the garden. He does this on a regular basis throughout the day just in case “something” has invaded Poland that might need to be sorted out.

I have been venturing further away from our usual morning walks now that the weather is more conducive to trotting around the countryside with my (somewhat less than) faithful hound Earl. I am attempting to lose a few kilo’s before summer arrives and takes me by surprise and there are worse ways to loosen a few stray kilograms than strolling around the glorious countryside that we happen to have migrated to back in 2007. It’s really lovely in Spring and Autumn and I make the most of it before I have to revert back to pre-dawn slinking around in the dark with Earl because it’s too hot in the sun to walk.

Earl ready for his walk
Here’s 35kg Earl looking decidedly smaller than he really is. I wish the camera did that for me but alas, it’s reserved for Earl apparently ๐Ÿ˜‰
Variegated Weigela
This is a Variegated Weigela it puts on a lovely show but is actually a very tough plant and well worth adding to most people’s gardens if you have a bit of space.

Because it’s been pretty cold, Bezial has been suffering a bit with arthritis in his front shoulder where he jumped out of our moving car through the window when he was a pup and injured himself. He had a decent walk and a swim yesterday so he got to stay home today with Steve whilst Earl and I headed out and I decided to take Earl for a nice long walk to tire him out. We walked to the Deviot Yacht club. Deviot is a neighbouring suburb to ours and a most desirable place to live. Earl loves to walk to Deviot and back but as it’s a 7km+ walk we don’t do it very often. Not only did we do it today but I walked him back down the highway so he got even more walk. He is currently fast asleep on his back on the couch so my plan worked!

Earl behaving
You can tell that we are almost halfway through our walk by this stage as Earl is behaving and actually sitting while I am taking this photo.
Some of this mornings walk
This is part of the walk that we took this morning. It’s just around the corner from the Deviot Yacht Club which was our turning destination. Note we don’t have footpaths or road verges on our roads out in the Tasmanian countryside so we have to be very careful of cars, trucks and cyclists when we navigate our twisty roads.
Accidental selfie
Part of the reason that Earl was sitting nicely in the first photo in this stanza was that he had just been chastised because he hauled me while I was trying to take a photo of that weigela to share with you and I ended up taking about 15 automated images and the camera reversed itself and I was taking photos of everything back to front! I sorted it out but not before I shot this accidental selfie.

Earl has regular stops on our walks in the district where he calls out to his friends over the fence or leaves them a “message” on their mailboxes. He left Porridge, the bolshie Yorkshire terrier a message this morning to say “Earl Woz Ere'”. I don’t think he realised that porridge doesn’t actually like him much but we won’t tell him now will we? The same goes for his friend Daisy who usually stands up on the gate to bark to him, his other friend (also called Daisy but with the prefix “crazy”) who must have been inside and his friend Libby who was with her human George adding deck rails to his new deck so Earl had to make do with telling ALL of the neighbourhood dogs that he owned every square cm of the walk too and from Deviot.

One of Earl's "Mailboxes"
One of Earl’s “Mailboxes” where he deposits his dog mail for his mates. Note I spared you the image of him making his liquid deposit.
Leaves starting to grow
Its lovely living in Tasmania as we have a wealth of European deciduous trees here that lose their leaves for the winter and that grow lovely fresh spring foliage. Here are some lovely poplars growing their fresh spring leaves.
Bonnie Beach walking trail exit
This is the exit to the Bonnie Beach walking trail. Earl and I walked over to Bonnie Beach in Kayena (over the water from us) the other day and Steve drove over with Bezial to meet us and have a walk around the trail.
Bonnie Beach car park
This is the Bonnie Beach car park. As you can see there are some glorious large oak trees here dwarfing our little car. It’s a lovely spot to take the dogs when summer heat hits for a swim to cool them down but at the moment it’s freezing cold in that water!

I was going to post a short compilation film of the area around here today but after we shot the footage and compiled it we had a lot of problems getting it to convert and when it did it looked terrible so I decided not to use it. It doesn’t help when you are filming through the car window and your husband is a lead foot and can’t go under 70km/hour or he explodes (apparently. I am somewhat skeptical about this claim…) but either way no footage for today so I took photos and accidental selfies this morning to pepper my post so that you can see why I am not averse to hoofing it with the hound on a regular basis at the moment.

Pretty native vine
This is a pretty native vine. I couldn’t tell you what it is called but I thought it was pretty enough to photograph and share with you all
Small tamarillo tree
This is a small tamarillo tree growing in Kayena. I am thinking of adding a tamarillo tree to our mix in Sanctuary.
Glorious echium in full bloom
Isn’t this echium lovely? Bees adore it and it puts on a really delightful display over a long period of time and is one of the most hardy plants that you could grow.

The local birds have been working overtime to raise babies and the cheese cubes seem to disappear from the window sill and the deck rail no sooner than I have put them out there. We have all of the local native murderers present and accounted for on Serendipity Farm but some of them appear to prefer cheese to murdering other birds/chicks but we did notice that Bruce, the male quotient of our resident pair of Australian Butcher birds had a distinctive red tinge to his chest feathers the other day whilst hoofing down a fist full of cheese so it would appear he may just have imbibed in one of our many baby chicks prior to cramming his craw with cheese to take home to fill his well fed babies cheeks. Not only is he scoffing chicks and native birds AND cheese cubes but he has decided that he quite likes the dogs steak. We leave it outside to thaw as we buy it in bulk (32kg a fortnight), divide it up into daily portions and freeze it and we take a couple of portions out a day as we now feed steak to our now tame male feral cats (don’t ask) and I thought that the cats were invading Poland to nibble on the sides of the frozen meat chunks but on closer inspection the invasion looked a whole lot more like long beak pecks than cat munches. Give these birds an inch and they will take a mile!

Australian butcher bird
Aussie Butcher Bird sourced from Wikipedia
Macadamia nut tree
This macadamia nut tree is on the property where we got two of our fig tree cuttings from. The figs on the tree grew huge so fingers crossed their offspring keep their mums characteristics as I love figs.

Just a reminder to people who may have forgotten, Steve and I are studying how to make short films this year at TasTAFE and aside from learning HEAPS (like I don’t actually want to make short films thank-you-very-much!) we are at the pointy end of the course now and Steve and I just spent a fortnight of solid swatting to complete all of the accompanying paperwork needed to support our film submissions. It certainly felt amazingly good to hand it all in and I am just about to hand in my edited short drama. Once it gets accepted and I have completed tidying it up according to my lecturers directives, I will share it here. Steve is about to film his short film (The Bench) and the same deal goes. Once he has finished filming and editing it, we will share it here to show you all what we learned (or didn’t) through the year.

Small Japanese maple seedlings
Every year, Japanese maples Tasmania over, spread their offspring far and wide. I dug up some pin oak babies yesterday to add to our Serendipitous mix but we have enough Japanese maples so these little babies can stay put
Cherry plum futures!
Cherry plum futures! I take mental note whenever I see feral fruit trees as in a few months they will be my and the native birds source of free fruit ๐Ÿ™‚

I can almost feel the courses completion and my reentry into the garden on a regular basis. I filled up the wicking bed tanks for the first time this season the other day (right before it rained) and watered Sanctuary using the irrigation system that we installed last year. Luckily I checked the watering system as it was leaking and we had to fix it but other than that it worked fine so once we had put a new clip on the offending weak spot, Sanctuary had a well deserved drink. Pretty soon I will be back to watering every other day in Sanctuary and once a week in Narnia (the wicking fridges). We are about to order some more topsoil for filling the rest of the fridge wicking beds that are currently full of water and mosquito larvae but once we get the topsoil I can mix it with the compost I have been hoarding shamelessly and we can plant out some more lettuce, greens and basil in these “new” beds.

Another view of Kayena from the other day
Another view of Kayena from the other day. This one is taken at the top of the steep hill just around the corner from Bonnie Beach. Earl LOVES to pull me down this hill. He reckons it’s the closest thing to us both running that we are going to get. He might well be right there! ๐Ÿ˜‰

I have been enjoying broad beans fresh from the wicking fridges and everything else is taking off now that the sunshine has returned. Even the minus 2C last night didn’t get to the tomatoes in Narnia but I bet that there is a long line of sad panda’s lined up to trudge in to Bunnings (local large hardware and nursery store in Australia) to pick up more tomato seedlings this morning as the frost will have knocked tomatoes the state over for six. There are more benefits than a lovely view to living near the water and less severe frosts is one of them.

Amazing mailboxes
Amazing mailboxes made by a local man are popping up all over the place in Kayena. He makes them out of welded (empty) small gas bottles and they look amazing!
If you would like your own custom mailbox...
If you would like your own custom mailbox…

I am starting to think that I will soon be able to get back to spinning as I had to put it on hold for a while as we waded through our work. We are helping fellow classmates film their films as well and as enjoyable as it is, it is also stressful acting, filming, doing sound and crewing for other people as you really want to do your best job and as we are all rank amateurs its often “fingers crossed” time for all concerned. I have held spinning in the back of my mind as my reward for all of my hard work and I have lots of lovely fleece of all kinds of creatures in my craft room wafting out at me every time I head into the craft room (which also doubles as a spare pantry where I store all of my spices etc.) I love that I can now spin my own custom yarn and one day I might just get good enough at it to produce something nice enough to make lovely things for other people.

My very favourite "Pauly Made" mailbox of all
My very favourite “Pauly Made” mailbox of all ๐Ÿ™‚

Well I think that might be all for today folks. I don’t want to wear your eyes out and I know it’s hard these days as everyone is used to small snippets of information in large doses. I hope you all have a spectacular Sunday and week ahead wherever you are and that you get to indulge yourselves with something suitably blissful at least once this week. “Enjoy!” ๐Ÿ™‚

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61 Comments Add yours

  1. brymnsons says:

    Some lovely photos Fran. We are heading into heat so just hot. hot, hot for us. I’m trying to get my watering system up to scratch and repotting what I can, while I can ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      The watering system is the biggest thing and if you get plenty of mulch over your garden you will be amazed at how moist your soil stays. It’s freezing here but getting drier. That’s our normal state of affairs over here in Summer. Not too hot but very dry and its only since I have been covering the garden beds heavily in mulch that the garden has started to survive summer much more happily. I am still using my cheapo phone to take photos. Do you have a passionfruit in Perth? You could grow all sorts of things in Perth conditions ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. brymnsons says:

        I always have a passionfruit Fran. It is Bruce’s favourite fruit, for his icecream ๐Ÿ˜€ . Yes mulch is very important. We get free mulch through our council, check out if yours does too.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. narf7 says:

        Our council are slackers. I just keep my eyes open for whenever the HTC (Tree butchers ๐Ÿ˜‰ ) are in the district as they are usually too lazy to haul the mulch back to their depot and dump it on a bush track and as Earl and I walk most of the highways out here we tend to noticed the tell tale signs and even if we can’t get it, we let someone else who can use it know. The bush telegraph is pretty fast. Passionfruit is the bomb. Mine is limping along but has lovely green leaves and managed to survive the toughest winter that we have had here since we moved in back in 2010 so I figure it’s going to go ahead with leaps and bounds now that the weather has warmed up and maybe I will get a passionfruit or two myself :). I got some kiwifruit cuttings yesterday morning and am attempting to grow them. I know it was a female kiwifruit and fingers crossed I can strike one or two of them to grow up the fenceline. I can’t eat them (allergic) but the possums won’t touch them as they hate the fuzzy leaves and so it might be an excellent fruit to grow all over the place here and I can trade them for something that I can eat ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      3. brymnsons says:

        What a shame you’re allergic to kiwi fruit, but I like your cunning plan ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      4. narf7 says:

        I can’t eat them but lots of people like them and they appear to grow well here so swapsies is a good reason to grow them ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      5. brymnsons says:

        Swapsies is definitely a good thing ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      6. narf7 says:

        My favourite thing of all. No money needs to change hands and everyone wins ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Snow! Hot water bottles!! That has happened here in November in the past – but it’s been very warm, so much so that it is difficult to sleep at night. More like late February weather than early November……. Obviously no bits of Antarctica drifting past my horizon ๐Ÿ™‚ All the signs are in for a long hot summer. The peonies are up a month before time, the pohutakawas are in flower and lore has it that when they flower before Christmas it’s going to be a good summer. (They haven’t flowered before Christmas for ages – I’ll guess four years.) I always enjoy going on a walk with you and Earl – beats my moribund urban environment hands down!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Earl and I are so lucky to have these walks right at our doorstep. It certainly makes the act of walking (being dragged behind Earl) a lot more inviting each day :). I was predicting a long hot summer as well. I am not entirely sure that we are going to get it. Hobart is in drought and farmers have been selling off their stock because they have no feed for them but here in the north we have green paddocks, plenty of feed and very happy farmers who can cash in on waiting till their stock are huge to cash them in. I would expect it to be colder in N.Z. but you guys have had it cold for a few years now. You are due a “South of France” summer if ever anyone was due one so enjoy it to the max Ms Pauline. I am sure Siddy isn’t complaining ๐Ÿ™‚ Don’t be surprised if that iceberg floats your way, Macquarie Island is halfway between Tassie and N.Z. so its your turn next!

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  3. foodnstuff says:

    The little native vine is Billardiera scandens, the Common Appleberry. The flowers are followed by long green berries which soften as they ripen and are edible and, would you believe it, taste like apple! Lovely photo!

    Love those Butcherbirds too. I once found one that had demolished a blackbird and was trying to get it up into a tree to hook up on a branch and eat. It was too heavy for him. I put it up there for him but don’t know if he came back to it or something else got it.

    Mornings have been freezing here too, but no frosts, so the tomatoes are OK.

    Do you hope to make money out of making films some day?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Thank you for the identification Bev and I am going to head over in a month or so to check it out for berries (if the native birds don’t scoff them all) to see if I can’t try growing some. I thought that the flowers looked lovely and if it fruits and is edible that would make it a valuable addition to my garden. The butcher birds are really lovely looking birds. I once saw one thrashing the heck out of a blackbird at TAFE. The speed at which it dispatched it’s victim was truly terrifying! I am not too upset that we have a pair breeding here and the wrens are just happy that the plethora of unwanted baby chickens is more tempting than they are at the moment. We also have currawongs eating as many eggs as they can hunt (thats a lot!), a pair of hawks that turn up most days to tag team the chickens and a resident kookaburra family that spend their days making our flock squawk and carry on like the sky is falling. I used to shoo them off but now that my chooks have decided to repopulate the earth no matter what, I am actually quite glad to see them as methods of chook population control! Thank goodness the tomatoes are up higher in wicking beds and that we are close to the water or I am quite sure that our tomatoes would have been lost. I want to use what we have learned making films to help us to add video content to my blog so that we can explain things better and I wouldn’t mind doing some filming for not for profit organisations to help people but I doubt that we would make money out of films. I would just be happy to help someone else spread the word ๐Ÿ™‚

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      1. foodnstuff says:

        The appleberry seeds can take a long time to germinate. The first time I sowed some, when they didn’t come up after a time, I just recycled the seedling mix into new stuff. Then strange seedlings started coming up in everything and a friend who was visiting and who knew what she was seeing said, “oh you’ve got lots of appleberry there. Duh!

        Often I find a spot in the bush where a berry has fallen and all the seeds have germinated into a little clump, then it’s easy to take them and pot them up individually. The plant looks great when it climbing delicately amongst other shrubs.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. narf7 says:

        I had best go and check where it is and leave a little marker for myself so that I know where it is and can keep checking on it. Cheers for the info Bev. Always great to know the growing habits of something you want to add to your garden ๐Ÿ™‚

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  4. What! Winter again!!… Brrrrr, not nice when you get a cold snap just as the birds are nesting too.. And so know how that feels, when we have had snow end of April, and beginning of May.. It throws everything including us into confusion.
    Sounds like you have had lots of studying to complete along with making your finished films Fran.. And will look forward, when you have helped others complete their projects to seeing your creations..
    A pity that the other film didn’t convert well.. Never mind.. I am sure we will Love your acting, and film debut ..
    Love the various trees, and blossoms, and great you found a little Maple.. We bought two from a local garden nursery in the spring. A red and a gold coloured one.. We couldn’t believe their price, they were only quite small about 9 inches, under one ft.. don’t know if you work in inches or cms.. but I still think in inches, even though we went metric in the 70’s .. lol.. And I worked in textiles where you had to use cms.. lol .. But tell me what something is in inches and I can visualise how big it is.. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Lovely that Earl got his long walk and loved the photos along the way too.. And those mail boxes.. I think the kettle was my favourite too..

    So enjoyed your post Fran, and hope you get some time soon to get back to your spinning and using the yarn…
    In the mean time, keep those water bottles topped up, and its another sad sign of global warming when you have icebergs floating off the islands..

    Take care and Enjoy the weather when it decides to warm up a little..

    Love and Hugs my friend..
    Sue โค xxx โค

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      The problem that we had with the film that we shot around here was that most of it was shot out of the car window as we were driving around the district and Steve has a lead foot so he had to slow the footage down so that you could actually “see” anything and when it converted it was very jerky. Next time he can film and “I” will drive! I know how to go under 20km/hour ;).

      I know inches as well. We only converted to cm when I was a kid and my mum and grandma talked in inches and feet rather than cm so I am ambidextrous in measurements ;).

      We are off on another decent walk today as I need to tire him out as Steve and I are both off to TAFE at the same time tomorrow. We have been staggering our appearances so that the dogs don’t get left on their own all day but tomorrow and Wednesday we have to both be in at TAFE as we are shooting a fellow classmates film tomorrow and then Steve’s the next day so it’s all hands on deck!

      I find that as the weather is warming up, my gardening mojo is returning in full force. I had no inclination to go into the garden in winter but now that I can feel sunshine on my back and see blue skies, all I can think about is the keyhole gardens that I am about to get constructing in the orchard area. We are going to use tea tree poles from the property cut down to size and with a pointy end cut on them to hammer into the ground (before it sets to ceramic ๐Ÿ˜‰ ) and then weave branches in and out of them to form the basis for the keyhole gardens. The centre will be a large cylindrical shape formed the same way (stakes into the ground at regular intervals and then branches woven in and out to form a structure). That way I can throw compost, chook bedding, grass clippings, leaves etc. directly into the keyhole garden (and Earl will be fertilising it from the outside ๐Ÿ˜‰ ) and you don’t need a huge lot of soil. I think I might make them a spiral as well so that I get more surface area to plant in and once the composting circle in the centre gets full I will use it as a worm farm in summer. It’s quite an exciting proposition. Here’s an article showing exactly what I want to do with the keyhole gardens if you are interested ๐Ÿ™‚

      https://permies.com/t/68883/permaculture-projects/keyhole-garden-summer-drought

      Thank you so much for reading my blog posts Sue. I love being able to connect with you over all of these miles (see what I did there? ๐Ÿ˜‰ )

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I did, you weaved nicely and wow, loved that shared link.. and will investigate further, though you know we here in England do get our share of water LOL.. ๐Ÿ™‚ well so far, who knows as climate change alters the jet stream etc..
        And A great idea about the worm farm.. I wish our back lawn did not have a good supply of worms and then Mr Mole would go somewhere else to dig up our lawn.. I think I have re-grassed around 8 patches over summer.. The last one being a couple of weeks ago, the grass is just growing and up he pops right in the middle of it again.. Sigh.. Never mind Moles are good teachers..
        It will be wonderful to get out in your garden again.. I know when Spring comes I am always itching to get out and started..
        I have to I was flagging and so I sat knitting instead.. And I left a lot for Hubby, But intend to label my Dahlias this year as I want the pompom ones in my home garden.. And last year Hubby forgot, so we didn’t know which was which so had to plant all back in allotments.. And I intend to take photos..

        Have a good week and so enjoyed your post and I for once was not late.. lol.. a first I think..
        If I am quiet answering, it is because I will be spending more of my week painting.. I want to do a few pictures and plan to give some as Christmas presents if I feel good enough.. we will see, I have no idea as yet what i will paint until inspiration grabs me..
        Take care and enjoy xxx โค

        Liked by 1 person

      2. narf7 says:

        We don’t have moles here in Australia. We have pointy little creatures called potaroos that dig conical divots out of the ground but I am guessing that moles do a LOT more damage. The potaroos are after grass roots not worms. Getting creative and crafty is a great salve for what ails you as well as letting your inner “you” express what you can’t say. I hope you get lots of lovely inspiration Sue and that you have a truly lovely week ๐Ÿ™‚

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      3. Thanks Fran.. just dropping in here as I await my paints to dry for a while.. And as I had a lovely phone conversation with our granddaughter just, who is off school at the moment with Chickenpox.. And will have to look up your potaroos, not heard of them either ๐Ÿ™‚ HUGS xx

        Liked by 1 person

      4. narf7 says:

        I hope your granddaughter feels better Sue. I never had chickenpox as a child. I had all of the other childhood things (measles, mumps etc.) but somehow managed to avoid them. Back then, your mum heard that some other kid had measles or mumps or chickenpox and hauled her entire brood around to catch them and get it over with! It’s a bit different these days ๐Ÿ˜‰

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      5. yes it was the same in our day.. But hubby has never had anything other than a cold and flu..in virus infections, and never had anything even when our kids caught measles, mumps and chickenpox.. So now Drs warn about shingles .. So we have been out of bounds for a while.. Thankfully it seems our granddaughter only had a mildish dose compared to how ill I know I was as a child.. thank goodness.. xxx

        Liked by 1 person

      6. narf7 says:

        My sister got Shingles when she was a teenager and was in hospital with it she was that bad. She had problems with pain and itching for many years afterwards and still has a bit of facial scaring thanks to shingles.

        Liked by 1 person

      7. Yes it can be very bad for some and that sounded nasty for your sister. .. Which is why Hubby had to keep his distance a little. But I think his immune system is a strong one as he never had any of the ailments our children ever had a child himself.. Yet his brother and sisters all did.. ๐Ÿ™‚

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      8. narf7 says:

        Some people are very unlucky and seem to get everything that goes around and some people miss out. Your husband is very lucky ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      9. VERY.. ๐Ÿ™‚ Yet at the same time he is clumsy and accident prone like Steve.. He can’t even walk into the garage or greenhouse without banging his head LOL.. Thankfully too he has very good healing skin.. Haha… ๐Ÿ™‚

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  5. Good luck with the rest of the course. Can’t believe how chilly it is for you…colder than England! One of my pups has arthritis and used to limp a lot. I’ve been giving him glucosamine daily in with his food for about 6 months now and about 2 months into treating him, the limping eased off and now he runs around like a puppy half his age!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I might have to copy that trick with Bezial Ms Chica. I was giving him fish oil tablets that he was happily eating but he suddenly went off them and now has the “steel clamp” jaws whenever I go near him with them. Do you crush the tablets into his food?

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      1. No, they come in plastic capsules which I pull apart and sprinkle the powder over Alfi’s food. He doesn’t seem to notice the taste and always gobbles down his dinner! I give him 500mg a day and he weighs about 9kg but if you Google it, there’s plenty of advice about doseage for dogs. Hope it works as well for him.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. narf7 says:

        I will pick some up and start attempting to give them to him. He is a very suspicious dog when it comes to his food so hopefully they are undetectable. Bezial weighs about 35kg so I might need to do some homework. Thank you Ms Chica! ๐Ÿ™‚

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  6. Jane says:

    Love the photographs, all so beautiful. Iโ€™m sure you could make photography your business somehow, and you live in such a picturesque place it seems. Looking forward to seeing your keyhole gardens, I use sticks like that on a much smaller scale to edge my herb garden bed, mainly to discourage the chooks and cats and I am considering edging one of my paths like that also, but I donโ€™t know if I have the patience. Sadly we are still waiting for some real rain and not just the odd spits, everything is beginning to look brown and bare roundabout here and it is not even summer yet. I have tomatoes, zucchini and pumpkin in homemade paper pots, that are ready to be planted out, but we are still getting frost forecasts so they will just have to wait a bit. Also very annoyingly even though I still have plenty of good grass in the baby food forest area kangaroos have been eating the new grow on the poor apple trees.

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    1. narf7 says:

      I have been taking the photos on our new cheap little phone as I usually have it when I am off walking on my own with Earl in case of emergencies. It makes a good stand by camera as well so it has a LOT more uses than our old, much more expensive, useless Nokia Window’s phone ;). Patience is something that we country people with bigger properties have to share around and meter out as we contemplate ALL of the things that we want to accomplish in a given time. I have so many plans but time and motivation have to strike while the iron is hot here. Sorry to hear about your lack of rain. It’s like that in Hobart too. So dry down there and yet so green up here. I used to wish that my dad had owned a property in Hobart as it’s really lovely down there but now I am just glad that he bought property up here. I might have to plant a couple of butternuts this year. I keep seeing them and I adore pumpkins so I might just have to plant some. Because the fridge wicking beds are so high off the ground, they seem to avoid the worst of the frosts. I am imagining that your property is like our friend Jenny’s. She studied horticulture with us back in 2009 and has so many wonderful ideas for her 50 acres but the native animals (especially the possums), the dry conditions and the fact that she gets frost all day that never goes away in the colder seasons really knocks her gardening mojo for six. She just got a job last year working in someone elses garden and is able to put her lust for gardening into that project. Apple trees do take a hammering don’t they? I have a small apple sapling that must have grown from an ancient apple tree that was long dead when we moved in. We cut it down and then one day I noticed that there was an apple seedling growing in an area of blackberries in the orchard area. Back then it was outside the house area but we extended the fence to include the orchard, thinking that Earl-the-wonder-dog who used to go out regularly through the night for his patrols but who now lays upside down snoring all night might keep the possums at bay. No suck luck! They come to the fridge wicking beds right outside the back door about a metre away from his dog door and know that they are safe now! Sigh… Anyway, I actually left a ring of blackberries around the apple tree to protect it from the possums. They might love apple leaves but they don’t love thorns in their paws so that little VERY tempting apple tree remains fully clothed all year. I may actually get some grafting material from some of the ancient apple trees growing in an old abandoned orchard in Exeter that we sometimes take the boys for a walk in as who knows what type of apples they may be? There are about 50 apple trees still alive and growing so it could be an interested experiment and you know I LOVE interesting experiments ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

  7. mortaltree says:

    Dang that is the biggest Echium I have ever seen! Breath-takingly gorgeous. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Thank you for commenting. Your blog is one of my absolutely favourite gardening blogs and I relish every single post that you make despite your growing conditions being likely the exact opposite of mine here in Tasmania. The passion for gardening is universal and we gardeners are most tenacious. That echium is a tiddler compared to some that have escaped into the wild around here. I think they just love the local growing conditions and the bees adore them so no-one cares that they are growing in the bush. Thank you, again, for commenting. I feel like a celebrity just shook my hand ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. mortaltree says:

        Well gosh that’s a surprise! I certainly have enjoyed finding out about you as well Fran. You have such a unique style of posting, and such a rich garden practice I really enjoy the privelege of following -even if I could never grow an echium that big!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. narf7 says:

        Thank you ๐Ÿ™‚

        Like

  8. Robbie says:

    You had a lovely Sunday! I agree with Pauline above, I enjoy going on “your” walks around your paradise. I can feel spring through your words!!!! I love when all the spring flowers and trees are blooming. It is one of my favorite times of the year.
    The trees will be losing all their leaves here in the next few weeks. It means PILES of leaves to rake and grind up for mulch. Once that happens we can put the garden to rest. I am waiting for some trees to be taken down.
    I had to chuckle about your accidental selfie.You’re not alone, I’ve done it too!
    I am looking forward to winter to settle down and clean out my art-extra room-studio. I ‘ve been trying to get it set up for the past few years. I just need some days inside not having to worry about taking care of plants out in the garden. We just turned our clocks back the other night, so now at 5pm, it will be dark. When it is dark- I can’t work in the garden!
    Off to take my dog outside to play. He plays fetch with a rope. I wear him out till he asks me to go inside. Yep, he runs to the door with his rope dangling from his mouth or he stands and barks at me to go inside-LOL:-) I TOTALLY understand Earl sitting when you are taking a picture. It means he is tired!!!. You have to wear out a pit bull..they are HIGH energy dogs!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Earl is decidedly high energy. I have been taking him for lots of walks lately and it has certainly made a difference to him. He loves walking but I think I took it a bit far the other day as we were walking in the hot sun and he didn’t like it. I usually walk him in the mornings but we were picking a bag of apples up from a local apple orchard and I decided to walk home from the orchard and on the way home we passed a muddy ditch and you can guess who decided to go upside down and roll all of the way down the ditch can’t you? He had mud ALL over him like a hippo ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Robbie says:

        I would love to do that myself! I wish humans could roll in mud and it would be acceptable-LOL I”ve noticed pit bulls do not like the hot weather when it gets past a certain point. They want to go home and lay down in the shade.
        Our old Chance is losing his hearing. He does not hear me when I come home. IN fact, he is sleeping soundly until I walk right in front of him and I startle him. BUTTT…he can fetch his rope forever. He also has not one once of fat on him from all his jumping. They are amazing dogs!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. narf7 says:

        It’s Earls 7th birthday today. He is as fit as a mallee bull (an Aussie saying as Mallee trees are found in the toughest environments and just keep on growing). We are taking him for a special walk today and he is getting chicken nuggets, bacon and eggs so you can’t ask for better than that on your birthday ๐Ÿ™‚ Earl has never fetched anything in his life and neither has Bezial. If we throw a ball, a rope, a toy, they run, they get it and they walk off with it. The concept of “bring it back to the human” is lost on our boys ๐Ÿ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Jane says:

    Hi Fran, I thought you might like this https://youtu.be/1OqXRcguFsg about growing apples from seed. I have one tree that blossomed for the first time this year. I planted it as a seedling about 8 years ago. Iโ€™m not expecting any fruit this year as it only had a couple of blossoms and they were right at the top. The tree is quite large and it has stood up to kangaroo attacks much better than the grafted ones. However the guy in the video got fruit from his seedling in 3or 4 years. They look like crabapples and he said they were very tasty. I hope my big tree fruits well next year then I might just get to taste an apple at last, and I wonโ€™t care what sort of apples they are! I am better off than your friend on 50 acres as the frost here is usually gone an hour or two after sunrise and then we usually get a mild sunny day, however the last few days have been quite windy.
    I sympathise with Earl, a few years ago I had bad arthritis pain in my knees and no over the counter pain relief helped at all. Then I started taking blackmores joint formula and lots of fish oil capsules. To my surprise the pain was gone in a couple of weeks but I kept taking them for about 3 years and then one day I felt I just couldnโ€™t swallow anymore so I stopped. To this day I have no pain in my knees.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I, too, have problem knees so this is very good advice. I might check out the Blackmores joint formula and see how Bezial and I go with it ๐Ÿ™‚ That’s an excellent link Jane. Thankyou. I will copy it and save it. My little apple tree is very happy now as the blackberries around it grew their spiny leaves back before it did and the possums are not going near it. I think that adding a few interesting grafts would be a good experiment as then I would get a mix of the original apple, as well as a few interesting cultivars to join the mix. We have a red and a green ballerina apples inside Sanctuary that are growing well. Steve grafted the red one but the green one was a gift from a friend and it is almost to the top of Sanctuary’s netting. There is also another apple that Steve grafted that we got the scion from when we were working with a fellow horticulture student back in 2010. It was from a very old garden that once belonged to the Tasmanian governor who was friends with the botanist Joseph Banks and this apple had a very interesting texture but was lovely and sweet and we were very surprised when the scion grew on the graft so we have that apple that is also very happy growing in Sanctuary as well so we do have a couple that are protected but I love the little wild one the most because it has had the hardest start and has kept on growing despite really tough conditions which makes it my particular favourite ๐Ÿ™‚ Whatever your apples are you can cook them if they aren’t particularly tasty raw and apples are amazingly resilient fruit trees but even the most resilient apple can’t stand up to the demands of our hoards of possums without a blackberry shawl! ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Like

  10. Jane says:

    If you go to the blackmores web site it will tell you the nearest stockist to you. When I bought my first joint formula the man in the health food cafe where I bought them strongly recommended taking the fish oil capsules at the same time. He was so insistent that I bought them as well and wondered if Iโ€™d been conned. However it worked and I never regretted taking his advice, but it was an awful lot of capsules to swallow several times a day, but I am still pain free and if I ever feel a twinge Iโ€™ll start them again. My daughterโ€™s dog, a Rottweiler, has just started a 4 week course of cartrophen (not sure of the spelling) injections, which is then to be followed with glucosamine treatment. Already a great improvement.
    My wild blackberry struggled to get going, but finally last year it put on a lot of new growth and some blossom, then before fruit set something ate it to the ground๐Ÿ˜ก of course I blamed the kangaroos. This year itโ€™s made up a lot of new growth so Iโ€™m still in with a chance. I have an experiment planned for the apple trees, if it works Iโ€™ll share, if it fails well I just donโ€™t know. How fantastic to have an apple tree with history! Might be interesting to grow a seed of that and see what you get.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      You have trouble growing blackberries? They are all over our property and are my arch nemesis! I spend a lot of time muttering about having to cut mine back as we don’t use poison here so it’s hack them back to the ground whenever I find a spare 5 minutes. I have some growing on the side of Narnia that I am going to have to hack back soon. I got their siblings before they put on leaves which made them easier to hack down but there was a nest of them growing back in the garden area that was hard to reach and they managed to escape my attention and now they are all back into full growing mode I am going to have to suffer the prickly consequences. I also have banana passionfruit going mental all over the place in the side garden that is starting to grow onto narnia along with honeysuckle (also going mental) and jasmine. The growing conditions are good here for Mediterranean plants to do their thang and they take every opportunity to invade Poland. I will try to get some apples from the old abandoned orchard this year. Most years the possums strip them all from the trees but I might be able to get one or two to see if I can grow some from a seed which would be very interesting. I just have to make sure to walk the dogs there a few times to check the trees. That was a great idea Jane ๐Ÿ™‚ Cheers for the info about your daughter’s dog. Bezial may need something like that as it is obviously starting to affect him now.

      Like

  11. It’s so beautiful out there, but that endless winter situation sounds like absolute torture to me. We just hit 50 (F) here and I had a small panic. Ugh, I hate the cold!

    Love those quirky mailboxes, on the other hand. My grandpa used to do something similar… He once surprised my parents by painting our mailbox like a cheetah, making the flag into a tail and all. Not everyone was a fan. Let’s just say that the box was quickly replaced by a bland white rendition in short order, and it was never spoken of again.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Your grandfather was making a statement. I fully approve of your grandfathers chutzpah Ms Hannah ๐Ÿ™‚ I love the cold. I love nothing better than snuggling up indoors with the fire going when it’s raining outside but I met some people when I was walking Earl the other day and they said that they couldn’t handle the cold here either. They were visiting from Mainland Australia as their daughter lives here and their son lives in Queensland, the exact opposite of here (more like Hawaii except hotter) and they live in the middle of them where it’s hot but dry. We have every climate here in Australia like you do in the U.S. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Jane says:

    I have trouble growing anything here except capeweed, wild sorrel and another weed I donโ€™t know the name of, but it thrives in bare dusty soil and also in the veggie beds and worst of all in amongst the grass and mallow where it trips me up. As water is usually in short supply here most of the time, I donโ€™t have a compost heap because I canโ€™t keep it damp and I donโ€™t have much green stuff to add to it, so when a veggie bed has finished I dig it out to become a pit into which I put all my compstables. When the pit is full I cover it over with soil and leave it to beak down. This autumn winter and spring have been so dry the system didnโ€™t work and before I could add horse manure I suddenly had a bed of ๐ŸŽƒ, potatoes, and tomatoes which all look so good at the moment Iโ€™ve decided to leave them and see what happens. Maybe Iโ€™ll have more luck with things that grow themselves. I would love to have your blackberries, ๐Ÿ˜‹

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I would love you to have them as well Jane ๐Ÿ˜‰ Your trenching compost idea is brilliant. It’s much along the lines that my grandad used to do with his sandy soil back in Denmark Western Australia where he lived. The back block was just sand and bordered onto a salt water estuary. It was easy to dig so he just started digging trenches about a metre deep and throwing all of the vegetative matter that he generated (tree prunings, veggie plants etc.) into these long trenches and as he added it he covered up the waste matter and it certainly improved the fertility of his soil. Our soil is about a week away from being bone dry at any given time. We haven’t had rain for almost a fortnight now and suddenly the soil is getting to the point of being impossible to dig. I NEED to get that persimmon tree out so it’s a good excuse for me to get out there today with the shovel methinks. That bed of potatoes and tomatoes obviously shows that they are happy with the growing conditions. I think things that grow themselves are more conditioned to the local environmental situation. We have tomatoes that still spring up in Sanctuary every year that are very tough and hardy but they have a tough skin so I don’t use them much. I should skin them and make sauce or something out of them but I tend to just leave them and they self seed for another year. Everything about gardening excites me. I think it’s the one place where humans and nature can both work together in harmony if we learn to listen to nature and take a leaf out of her book. I wish I could send you my blackberries and my banana passionfruit!

      Like

  13. Jane says:

    Thanks for the blackberry thoughts. Banana passion fruit, I havenโ€™t tasted, is it tasty and would it be frost tolerant? My hardenbergia I thoroughly the frost killed put up two new leaves which have promptly been eaten, probably the chooks this time as the leaves were very small.
    I wish us both rain โ˜”๏ธ

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I watered Narnia and Sanctuary for the second time this season since we stopped watering back in March at the beginning of the year. We got plenty of rain right through till last week when it suddenly stopped and the weather started to heat up. It looks like it is going to be a warm one this year which means that we might get a chance of ripening some tomatoes. I bought an eggplant from Bunnings as I adore them and they never go below $6 a kilogram here in Tasmania and fingers crossed I might get to harvest some this year. I also planted out some Japanese eggplants which are long and thin but the seeds haven’t germinated. It has been very cold overnight here of late and warm in the days. Steve and I did a bit of work in the garden yesterday and we actually planted out my poor long suffering persimmon tree that he bought me back at the beginning of the year. We have to put irrigation around the fruit trees this year and I have found a stand of comfrey that eventuated from someone’s discarded garden waste that I am going to dig up and plant around the fruit trees now on your suggestion. I am also going to heavily mulch the area around the fruit trees and the keyhole gardens will hopefully keep the moisture in the soil. I have noticed that since I have been heaping up mulch inside Sancturary, it has been much more self sustainable when it comes to water. 2 chooks had gotten in at the back of Sanctuary where we found it open (when ducky escaped a few weeks ago). I was OK with them being inside there as they didn’t appear to be doing too much damage but I went up to give them more food yesterday and they had wreaked carnage on my mulch! I got Steve to open up the back of Sanctuary and we eventually chased one out but the other one kept bypassing the open rear of Sanctuary and racing around the perimeters. We haven’t whipper snipped inside Sanctuary yet so it’s a bit of a jungle in there with weeds up to your armpits going mental because it’s pretty fertile in there and so you can imagine me leaping through the jungle to try to round up a madly clucking chook! In the end I cornered her and grabbed her (protesting all the way I might add!) and threw her out the back. We closed Sanctuary back up (we made it so that we could get in the back to haul up manure etc. but we haven’t got a tow hitch on our little Hyundai we got after our little 4 x 4 died so we haven’t been able to haul manure etc.) and I had to spend half an hour in the hot sun trying to reapply mulch to my plants! I wasn’t a happy camper with those chooks I can tell you! Banana passionfruit grows maniacally here. When we first moved in it was about 30 metres up in the air in most of the blackwood trees and we had to hack it down to the ground by cutting it off at the base and we call it “dungbeetling” (we roll it up into a big ball and roll it off to burn it) it away. The fruit is something I can take or leave but both my mum and my eldest daughter love it. It’s a bit of a problem weed here in Tassie and it gets pretty dry and frosty in most places so I am thinking it must have some kind of frost tolerance. Let me know if you want some seed to try as I have one of the fruits dangling down inside Narnia that I noticed yesterday that I will let ripen if you would like to try it :). I think we have rain forecast in about 5 days time. I have found that with my careful mulching (without chook intervention!) of Sanctuary and of the wicking beds in Narnia and the water reservoir in the base of the wicking beds I can get away with only watering once every 3 – 4 days when it’s warm here. The sun has a real bite to it in Tasmania even though it’s not particularly hot on the Aussie heat scale and it can dry out an area in a very short time. I made sure to mulch the persimmon when we planted it yesterday and will keep an eye on it over the next few days as it went from shade to full sun. Hopefully it doesn’t cark it! I wish us both incredibly good garden experimentation. I am learning a lot from you Jane. Thank you SO much for sharing your wisdom with me ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

  14. Jane says:

    I meant I thought the hardenbergia was dead.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I figured as much ๐Ÿ™‚ I thought my lemongrass was dead but Steve found a green leaf base on it yesterday and now that the weather is heating up it should be suiting it better. Fingers crossed it comes back from the dead ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

  15. Jane says:

    Yes please Fran, I would love some banana passion fruit seeds if you have any to spare. Sadly I donโ€™t think I will be able to send you any moringa seeds as my little tree apppears to be dead. I worry that you say you are learning from me! Donโ€™t do that, your garden is so much more productive than mine, I would have starved or died of scurvy long ago without the local IGA! My biggest problem after the lack of rain was not understanding my local climate and trying to plant a conventional orchard with nicely mown grass. Itโ€™s taken me far too long to discover food forests and so everything is too spread out. I have a lot of gaps to fill and a lot of bare dry ground, and definitely too many kangaroos. So far peaches look good, but since I never beat the birds to them Iโ€™m not getting my hopes up. Strawberries are doing well and Iโ€™ve been eating them on my early watering rounds. Iโ€™ve had 1 self seeded lettuce which Iโ€™m still picking from and my ever faithful broad beans and rhubarb always produce well, even though they get munched and bounced on they still feed me reliably. New plants are Jerusalem artichokes which are doing well but I worry they may get eaten when they out grow their protection, and raspberries. Iโ€™ll just die if something eats my raspberries. Typically I grew globe artichokes one year only to discover I really donโ€™t like them, and I donโ€™t know anyone who does. I never water them and they come back year after year. Nothing eats them and the bees donโ€™t seem that interested, but they do make great shady chook caves in the summer. Iโ€™ve been watering all autumn and most of the winter and all spring.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I tried to grow moringa but they all died. I have been able to grow a few things from seed but I am not a natural green thumb. I will let you know when the seeds are ripe and we can work out where I can send them to. Are you on Facebook? My garden might be greener than yours but it isn’t incredibly productive yet. The problem is that I am building soil and the plants are still adapting to the conditions and with our short growing season and my inability to get my head around succession planting or when to plant what for the best results, I am a pretty sucky gardener but what I lack in natural talent, I more than make up for with enthusiasm ;).

      I have a decent crop of peaches on my poor long suffering possum mangled peach tree that was prehistoric when we moved here back in 2010 but the possums will eat them when they are green. I can only begin to imagine how terrifying a possums digestive systems are! My rhubarb died. It was in a lovely spot with plenty of mulch but I think it may have drowned in the winter before last as it never stopped raining! Jerusalem artichokes are scoffed by the wallabies here if they are outside. If you put a ring of chook wire around them they seem to do well as I have some outside in a wire ring and I never water them and they still survive so they must be VERY tough.

      I adore globe artichokes and have 5 inside Sanctuary now and one large one in the garden that suffers the chooks and the wallabies but keeps coming back. I need to plant more! I truly love them and have been known to cook up a large stockpot of them and sit with a spoon and eat them all myself as no-one else likes them. I must have some Italian in my heritage somewhere ๐Ÿ˜‰

      The raspberries are going mental in Sanctuary. We just whipper snipped in between the beds as we are moving Limpy, Steve’s stoic little chook who was born unable to use her feet. She walks on her knuckles and has been in a cage all winter long and we decided that she can live in Sanctuary with our old half blind duck. I noticed one of the chooks that we managed to shoo out yesterday was on top of the netting trying to get back inside when we were whipper snipping. Cheeky minx!

      Let me know if there are ever seeds of anything I have here that you are interested in and I will send them to you. I do love to share ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

  16. Jane says:

    Lol, I donโ€™t know about Italian heritage and artichokes. Last year I gave my daughter a large bag full of artichokes for the Italian and Greek ladies she works with. Three said no thanks, they didnโ€™t like them and two said yes theyโ€™re ok if someone else cooks them but we canโ€™t be bothered doing it. The bag was then left for anyone to take, but nobody did.
    Iโ€™ve found rhubarb likes a drink, but not wet feet. It doesnโ€™t do sog. The chooks in Sanctuary probably did you a favour by cleaning you mulch of earwigs and such, and also probably left some fertiliser as well. This morning I moved some old boards while the chooks were watching. Underneath the boards were heaps of earwigs and slaters. The chooks were ecstatic.
    Thank you for the offer of seeds, also I like to share so if I mention anything you would like let me know, tho I wonโ€™t send illegal stuff. I donโ€™t do Facebook. I did try it once but it nearly drove me mad.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      We don’t seem to have earwigs here. When I lived in Western Australia with my ex husband, we moved around from small town to small town quite a lot as he was furthering his career and in one of the small towns there seemed to be a terrible earwig problem. They were everywhere and in everything and I learned to hate that smell that the exude. I have seen all of 2 earwigs here in Tasmania since I moved here in 2007 so I think that’s a fair trade for the drowned rhubarb ;). The easiest way to prepare artichokes is to just boil them whole. Most people take all of that time to prepare them but if you boil them whole and then remove the fluff afterwards it’s SO much easier! It tends to come away in one large clump.

      We can get quite a lot of seeds here in Tasmania but the main reason a lot of seed companies have the logo “We will not send to Tasmania or Western Australia” on them is because they have to fill out a tonne of paperwork in order to send seeds and they are lazy bollocks! The only seeds that we can’t import are solanoids (tomatoes, potatoes, chillies etc.) no ginger family (for some reason even though it’s hard to grow it here) but the main problems are fresh fruit (not the seeds) and honey. Everything else is pretty much fair game aside from conifer seeds. I am only on Facebook to keep up with family and friends to be honest. I am getting heartily sick of it. I found a way to block the advertising and that news thingo on the right hand side which made the experience a whole lot better but I can see the day where I stop using it altogether. I will be doing a bit of filming today as yesterday we whipper snipped Sanctuary, moved Limpy the chook to Sanctuary (hopefully she isn’t upside down tangled in the raspberries this morning ๐Ÿ˜‰ ) and spent some time in the garden. I will likely write a new blog post today and fingers crossed I will have a short film of the garden etc. to share with you all. We even have sound equipment but I HATE my voice (and being on camera) so it’s likely you will hear Steve’s voice more than mine. Have a lovely week Jane ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

  17. Spy Garden says:

    All the best in finishing up your coursework. I can finally see the light at the end of the tunnel of my schooling as well: and many visions of gardening/hobbies dancing in my head once I am done! Looks like a lovely spring down there in the southern hemisphere; its getting cold here! Pop over to Spy Garden if you get a chance!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I will! Its mental here. I am filming another students film tomorrow but hopefully after that I will be able to get stuck into the garden ๐Ÿ™‚ Congratulations on your studies. Yours are most likely MUCH more difficult than mine but at least you don’t have to film someone elses “vision” ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Jane says:

    We had โ˜”๏ธโ˜”๏ธโ˜”๏ธโ˜”๏ธAll day. All my swales are full๐Ÿ˜„๐Ÿ˜„๐Ÿ˜„๐Ÿ˜„Hope you got what you needed too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Barely a spatter here but I would gladly give it up so that you can have bucket loads Jane ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

  19. Jane says:

    Sorry if you missed out on the rain. Weโ€™ve had 98mm since 9am yesterday and before that 20mm. Unbelievable. My house sits between two usually dry creeks, which yesterday were full to the very brim. Iโ€™m really glad they didnโ€™t spill over. I couldnโ€™t get across to shut up the chooks or feed the horses until 7.30pm. The causeway between my house and the shed and food forest is a mess, it even has some old furniture stranded on it which floated down from up stream. All my swales filled and only one small breach. Donโ€™t know what Iโ€™ll do in the mornings now I donโ€™t have to water๐Ÿ˜„.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I am blissfully happy that you got all of the rain Jane. We have had more than our fair share over the last few months and I don’t mind picking up the hose if it means that you get some seriously well deserved rain โค ๐Ÿ™‚

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