And so it goes…

Hi All,

Another Sunday came and went and I didn’t do a blog post but this time it was deliberate as I wanted to film a short video of our property to show you and we were too busy yesterday because we were in the garden rehousing Steve’s disabled chicken “Limpy”. Limpy is an exception to the rule. When she was born she had something wrong with her feet. She has been unable to walk properly since she was a chick but has a fierce determination to survive. All of the other chickens would set on her and peck her but she would hide and would make her way out to the food each morning from where she had been hiding and eventually we decided that we would put her in a safe enclosure because she has the most ferocious will to survive.

Early morning Earl walk
Earl and I have been doing a lot of walking lately. Aside from Earl needing to walk or he eats the furniture, “I” am walking more since the weather warmed up. This yacht is moored just opposite our front gate.
Devil's Elbow Sidmouth Tasmania
This body of water is called Devil’s Elbow and contains two small islands, Redwood Island and a smaller Islet called Drumstick Island. Earl and I were walking from our house (where I was standing at the front gate taking the photo) around the water to the other side to go to Bonnie Beach where Steve and Bezial meet us driving in the car.
Drumstick Island Kayena Tasmania
Earl and I met up with Steve and Bezial at Bonnie Beach and we all walk around a little pathway past Drumstick Island and back to the beach where Bezial can splash to his hearts content.
Bonnie Beach Kayena Tasmania
This is the car park at Bonnie Beach, one of Bezial’s very favourite places to cool down when the weather heats up. He is getting on now so doesn’t have to do the full walk but gets to drive in style with Steve to our destination and splash to his hearts content before Earl arrives to spoil everything.

She has been living in an enclosure in Steve’s shed all winter long and we decided that after we shuffled the two chickens that had snuck in to the rear of Sanctuary when we had a brief malfunction in the netting (that also let ducky out but we have since recaptured her and put her back in) that Sanctuary would be the perfect safe spot for Limpy and yesterday she was moved in with great ceremony. She was incredibly happy to move and set off to explore her new enclosure complete with lots of lovely greenery and places to hide.

Pretty garden in Kayena Tasmania
Isn’t this garden pretty? It’s on route on Earl and My walk to Bonny Beach. I thought I would take a photo to share with you all but most of the gardens along the way look lovely. We are very lucky to have so many lovely walks to choose from πŸ™‚
Bezial blow fish hunting on Paper Beach
This is Bezial blow fish hunting on Paper Beach. Paper Beach is his absolute favourite place to go blow fish hunting. He never catches any (thank goodness!) but it doesn’t stop him trying.
Blow fish patrolling
Just before this photo, Bezial got a bit too adventurous hunting blow fish and ended up having to swim. He stepped off the edge of an embankment and Bezial only likes to go up to his belly in the water but this time he had to swim for it. He is back in “safe” water in this shot.
Sidmouth Tasmania on the Tamar River
We are at the furthest extent of Sidmouth Tasmania as our property borders this road that separates our front gate from the Tamar River. This is the view that Earl and I get on a lovely spring day as we launch out onto our morning walk. How lucky are we?

I headed in to check on her this morning thinking that as she can’t use her feet and has to walk on her (chicken alternative to) wrists that she might be upside down in the tenacious raspberry plants but she was sitting next to her enclosure and after being fed some wholegrain bread she was very happy. It makes me happy to know that this little chicken who had such a difficult start to her life but who had such a ferocious will to survive can live out her days in Sanctuary along with our old one eyed duck.

Bottle brush flowers in Kayena Tasmania
Here in Australia, bottle brush flowers are passe but for the rest of the world they are something special. Here’s some passe bottlebrush flowers in Kayena Tasmania πŸ˜‰
This house belongs to Albert. Albert is an elderly German man who I often meet whilst walking Earl in Kayena. His wife passed away earlier this year and he walks with a dog who appears to have adopted him and who is known as the community dog. The dog likes to walk with anyone who walks around Kayena and Earl and I have met up with him a few times. Luckily he is friendly and walks with us as far as his front gate. Albert used to make grappa and sell it but he removed his grape vines as it was all getting a bit too hard. He is a most interesting man and Earl and I like to meet up with him whenever we see him and have a chat.
Kayena Tasmania
I often show you the view from our side of the river over to the other side but this is the view from next to Albert’s house looking back over the river. Earl and I walk all around the river to this spot which is just around the corner from Bonnie Beach. It’s lovely the whole way πŸ™‚

I have been walking Earl a lot lately. Aside from him needing the exercise, so do I, so we have been walking further than usual in our mutual pursuit of fitness. I have discovered that Earl doesn’t like walking in the heat of the day and so we walk early in the morning to take advantage of the cool and shade. Yesterday we went to Paper Beach, Earl and Bezial’s very favourite walk, where Bezial can indulge his desire to trawl for blow fish (puffer fish) and Earl can walk the well trodden and dog sniffed bush tracks. Steve drops Earl and I off on the highway and we make our way to the beach where Bezial is wading in the water happily.

A stand of ancient conifers in Kayena Tasmania
There aren’t many stands of old conifers left in Tasmania. They keep getting cut down for people to get a view but this lot don’t interfere with anyone’s view so hopefully they might get to remain for the foreseeable future.
Looking down the hill that Earl and I have just hauled ourselves up. We are most up and we stop for Earl to have a treat. Our car is right behind that school bus in the distance as he brings Bezial up to Bonnie Beach for his splash pre-Earl arriving.
A tale of two oak trees
This is Glad’s property. It’s called “4 Oaks” but has decidedly more than 4 oaks. I am guessing the 4 oaks is because there are 4 oaks along the front of the property and the one on the left in this image borders on our property. Notice how lovely and dark its foliage is. The reason for the difference is that Glad insists on raking up all of the fallen oak leaves each year and burning them. I leave all of the oak leaves on the ground on our side so the tree has a lot of nutrients and mulch underneath it and the end result is a happier, healthier tree (and we don’t have to pay anyone to rake and burn them like Glad does)
Just so you can see them, here’s the other 2 oaks and Glad’s house. She has often had people drive up and ask her if she wants to sell her house. She doesn’t. Just so you know πŸ˜‰

This morning we decided to walk to Bonny Beach and phone Steve and Bezial up when we were halfway to our destination which gives Bezial enough time to splosh around in the estuary before Earl arrives to spoil his fun and Earl enough of a walk to prevent him eating our furniture while we are AWOL at TAFE. Steve is acting in a fellow students film tomorrow and I am filming it. After seeing what the fellow student wants me to actually film I am not so sure that I am the best person for the job but as everyone else is unavailable she is going to have to take what she can get which is “moi” so I practiced filming today and made you all this short film shot inside the house fence on Serendipity Farm. I might even get Steve to mic us up and do a bit of a voice over with the sound gear that we brought home from filming Steve’s film shoot last Wednesday. Filming is fun but hard work!

This lighthouse is right in front of Glad’s house. It is a marker point for boats navigating the Tamar River at night time. It’s apparently pretty old and has historical significance so they can’t just knock it down and replace it like they did with the one on the point.
Grass, glorious grass!
Grass, glorious grass! Steve spotted this on his way home from taking his friend to Exeter the other day. It seems the council has started their regular mowing cycle for the year! Bliss to narf7 who gets to harvest the end results for mulching her garden πŸ™‚
Sidmouth Hall Sidmouth Tasmania
This oval belongs to Earl. He just wants everyone to know that. He allowed me to drive up and rake up several bags of (free) mulch for my garden recently but ONLY on the proviso that I let everyone know that it’s “his park”.

On our way home from walking the boys yesterday we saw a flock of magpies on the road and slowed down to take a closer look. On closer inspection we saw a crow attacking a magpie on the road. I got Steve to stop and jumped out of the passenger seat to check and the crow flew off when I approached. It turned out to be a baby magpie on the road which the crow obviously thought was road kill and the magpies flapping around on the road were it’s parents. I picked it up to warning squawks from the parents and carefully carried it over to the shade on the side of the road. The parents were readying to swoop down at me when I walked away and back to the car and as I got into the car the parents both started singing to me in relief. It’s the most magical feeling to know that the magpies were expressing their relief and appreciation to me for saving their baby πŸ™‚

Australian native bush tomato
This is an Australian native bush tomato. It’s been growing here for a few years now and one day I am going to get to harvest some fruit and try growing it myself. It’s too high up the bank for the annual roadside thresher to chop off and I am keeping my beady little eyes on it for any signs of fruit ripening.
Courtesy of Wikipedia, this is what the flower, fruit and leaves look like up close.
Also courtesy of Wikipedia, this is what the dried fruit looks like and this is how it’s predominately used.

The weather is starting to warm up nicely here in Northern Tasmania. The nights are still nice and cold but the days are officially heating up to spring weather. We lag behind the rest of Australia temperature wise as a rule and I couldn’t be happier to be honest. I am not a fan of hot weather and despite my love of tropical fruit, I am most happy sitting next to a fire rather than sweltering in a humid rain forest. I have been most impressed by the way that Sanctuary is coming along since I have been heavily mulching it and have decided that I am going to create a series of keyhole gardens inside the house fence using the following inspiration

https://permies.com/t/68883/permaculture-projects/keyhole-garden-summer-drought

Anyone who has prior experience with keyhole gardens, I would be most glad to hear from you. We are going to make them out of tea tree poles cut down and filed off to points on the end and hammered into the ground with green thin branches woven in and out of them exactly like the images in this excellent article that I found on permies.com. I find a lot of interesting and inspiring articles on this forum and enjoy reading about other people’s solutions to people’s problems. I also found a combo keyhole garden combined with a hugelkultur garden that piqued my interest on the same site and thought that this would be the best way to go outside the house fence but inside the house fence I want a more traditional keyhole garden and will be making several of these gardens to populate with herbs and dye plants for future fleece dying and spinning experiments.

Free mulch haul
My first haul of free mulch. They say that mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the midday sun. I know that the Englishmen wasn’t stupid enough to go out as I was the only one collecting this mulch so that doesn’t leave me much choice as to who I represent in the song now does it! πŸ˜‰ I don’t care. I have started my free collection of mulch for this year and that’s all that matters. Soon they will do the same to the big park over the Batman and Stevie-boy will have to venture out with me to bag and haul πŸ™‚
Eggs and Broad Beans
When we say our eggs are “free range” we mean it! The chooks range wherever the heck they want to and usually don’t go back to the roost at night to nest. I found most of these in the fresh hay that I put in the roost so am counting my lucky stars and both Earl and Bezial get eggs for dinner tonight. The broad beans came from the wicking beds and there are still lots more to harvest πŸ™‚

I love a good experiment folks and am currently thinking about growing apples from seed as Jane, one of my lovely faithful blog followers shared an excellent tutorial about growing apple trees from seed with me recently in a comment. There is an old abandoned apple orchard in Exeter, a town 18km away from us, that we sometimes walk the dogs in. I am going to collect some apples from these ancient trees and see if I can’t grow some apples from the seed. I am also going to get some scion wood from these trees in winter and am going to graft it onto our little apple sapling that grew from the ancient, long dead, apple tree that was on the property when we moved here back in 2010. I have left a ring of tenacious blackberries around the perimeter of this apple to discourage our furry possum nocturnal visitors from predating it’s tasty leaves and you can be assured that these are the ONLY blackberries that I will be allowing to survive and flourish inside the house fence!

Herman the compost tumbler
I sometimes think that EVERYTHING on Serendipity Farm is rusty but I have it on very good authority that it’s “Industrial chic” thanks to Jo of “All the Blue Day” blog. Consider Herman Industrially chic and the pile of spent chook hay at his feet is going to be wheelbarrow-ed up to the back of Sanctuary in the near future.
Lambs ears and blueberries in wicking fridges
Lambs ears and blueberries in wicking fridges. I think the lambs ears might be about to be transplanted though as they appear to be taking over. Note this is Bezial’s shady bit of the back yard. He moves between the shade and the sun on a regular basis till he gets bored of it and comes inside.
Oca and bamboo
This is the oca bed that the possums decimate every year as they adore the sour leaves. They are starting to grow back but note the black bamboo stakes that I “found” on one of my recent walks. They had been thrown onto a burning pile and I figured that they would be better off preventing possum damage than burnt so here they are!
Small grape vine dug out of a ditch
This is a small grape vine dug out of a ditch on one of Earl and my walks recently. It was growing tenaciously opposite the Tamar Ridge winery and we figured it wanted to come home with us. It appears to be very happy now and will be planted out in Sanctuary soon to join the other feral grape vines.
Free Queensland blue pumpkin plants! A lady up the road from us regularly puts out free plants from her garden. She is incredibly generous and I am going to gift her all of our old pots so that she can keep being generous with what she doesn’t want. I picked these up this morning on Earl and my walk and had to hide them in the bush as free plants go fast!Β  till Steve and Bezial came and picked us up halfway to Beaconsfield. I retrieved them on the way home.
Another free pumpkin planted in one of the empty wicking beds. It can go mental here to it’s heart’s content πŸ™‚
Goaty Hill Winery Kayena
Earl and I are getting more adventurous on our morning walks. This morning we veered off on the road to Beaconsfield (an 8km walk) but it was TOO HOT so we had to phone Steve and Bezial to come and pick us up in the rescue wagon (our car). We waited in the shade not too far from Goaty Hill winery, a lovely spot for a decent drop of wine.
Beauty Point Tasmania
After Bezial and Steve picked us up we headed over to Beaconsfield to pick up some more chook wheat for our guzzling hoards and then on to Beauty Point for Bezial to have a bit of a splash at this beach.

I am typing this blog post while I am waiting for the film clips that we filmed earlier to download so that we can piece them together, add some music to it to share with you all here. Hopefully you will like our little montage of Serendipity Farm filmed from inside the house perimeter in spring in Northern Tasmania 2017. I hope that you are all enjoying your lives wherever you are in the world and that life is treating you well. Catch you next week πŸ™‚

Well here’s the video. I have decided to rename what most people currently call “weeds” to “Beneficial insect habitat” for the duration. I am sticking with it so no pointing out all of the “Beneficial insect habitat”Β  in Sanctuary OK? πŸ˜‰

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37 Comments Add yours

  1. I am envious of your morning walks – such variety and always that lovely river and various beaches to explore. The film is excellent – in parts it could almost have been an olde-timey view of life, especially when man and dog appeared. Imagine that little bit done in a sepia tint – it would really be fun! Loved Steve picking Earl up and turning him round – dear old Earl, no clue what was going on πŸ™‚ Your camera work is excellent I thought – you pan at just the right speed so I don’t get vertigo and fall off my chair – which I sometimes do with YouTube videos! I think you are perfectly able to make vlogs of life on Serendipity now – you can chatter away to us instead of writing it all down …… I’m looking forward to the first of those!! Thoroughly enjoyable post Fran – thank you! πŸ™‚ ❀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Earl doesn’t like being manhandled as he thinks that he is the top of the ladder around here and being hauled off his pegs is a bit of a reminder that there are humans that can hoist your petards πŸ˜‰ I adore the walks that Earl and I get to go on each day and every time I walk, I start out a bit twitchy (being hauled down a steep craggy driveway will do that to a girl…) but a few moments into the walk I get this amazing feeling of good grace that comes over me and I start to count my blessings because I am incredibly lucky to be living this life and whether I am being hauled behind a most determined dog, I am at least getting fitter in the process and how many people get up and see the suns golden rays turning the landscape into a picasso every morning eh? Steve pans too quickly. If you watch the video again there is a decided spot where some quick panning takes place. That’s Steve’s πŸ˜‰ We are going to get some sound equipment of our own and we will start posting more videos to share with you all and I promise that we will properly introduce ourselves to you all (wrinkles, grey hair and all!). I want to share all of the videos that I took part in with you on the blog but I am slightly terrified of how everyone will react! I starred (with Steve) in another classmates film about a runaway and we were rescuing her but we looked slightly like serial killers. I have finished my film and will share it next week and Steve has just finished his and after being marked, he will let me share his here as well. I also acted in 2 other films (so 3 in all!) and filmed one. In one of the films I got to scream like a horrible banshee at one of my lecturers. It was most cathartic πŸ˜‰ I doubt that I will share the link to that film with you all ;). Thank you for being my most loyal reader Ms Pauline from the bottom of my heart ❀ and here's to MANY more over-the-ditch comments from us both πŸ™‚

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      1. I did notice the quick panning, but as it was just a short part of an otherwise impeccable piece let it go – I didn’t want to be picky πŸ™‚ I just saw an upload from Steve on YouTube as I am one of your subscribers and therefore get notified when something is uploaded. It’s really good – you and your mate both act and overact perfectly and are naturals – I see a French farce in your future – you would be soooo good in it! I chuckled out loud a couple of times – especially when you cracked each other up πŸ™‚ I really enjoyed it!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. narf7 says:

        AARRRGH! I forgot about that! πŸ˜‰ Check out my video there as well (you get an advanced screening for following Steve’s channel πŸ˜‰ ) it’s the one called “Gone”. Let me know what you think…

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      3. Oh ho – that’s good! Did she really go? Did he just dream it? But there’s the missing pic on the milk……. What happened to the dog? If she’d really gone the house would have been in a terrible mess……… Every neglected woman’s fantasy πŸ™‚ Really good Fran!!

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      4. narf7 says:

        Thank you Ms Pauline (blush) that makes me very happy. I haven’t been able to share it with anyone as of yet as I hadn’t been marked on it. Glad to see it sparked some thought πŸ™‚

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      5. When do you get your marks?

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      6. narf7 says:

        When my lecturers can be bothered to let us know if we passed but I think we have. One of our lecturers told Steve and I the other day that our work was excellent so fingers crossed, the stuff we handed in to the other one meets muster as well. That vid you initially watched, was a fellow classmate Georgie’s film. We were going to film it as a class project as lots of people hadn’t done “something” that they needed to do to fulfill the course requirements like filming or doing sound etc. but in the end we all managed to get there so the script that I wrote (The Incompetents) was left up in the air but then Georgie’s actress fell through and she couldn’t find anyone else and was starting to stress a bit so I said “Why don’t you use The Incompetents?” It was supposed to be a bit of fun to film with all of the serious stress that most of us were putting ourselves under to film our films and to get them edited ready for marking and it was great fun to film and act in. I based it on dumb and dumber and Georgie (who is a really good artist, I think you would love her) and I really hammed it up. Glad you liked it as this is Steve’s edit of her footage (that he filmed) so that she can show our lecturers something on Tuesday at TAFE. Fingers crossed they like it πŸ™‚ Either way, it was a hoot to film and was certainly a change from the more serious hard slog that most of us had to do to get our films made πŸ™‚

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      7. It’s pretty obvious a lot of planning and forethought went into the ones I’ve watched – and you never know whats involved until you get to do it yourself do you. It’s a great skill to have up your sleeve!

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      8. narf7 says:

        I am a million miles away from the clueless person who started the course at the beginning of the year. I certainly know the value of good teamwork and excellent organisation skills! I didn’t even watch films at the beginning of the year and was more like one of the Incompetents than I would like to admit πŸ˜‰ I just want to be able to share things with you all in a more fluid way and videos with talking is the next step. If that’s all we ever use our skills for I will call it a solid thumbs up for this year πŸ™‚

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  2. foodnstuff says:

    Great post, Fran! You are so lucky to be surrounded by all that beauty and have such lovely walks to go on.

    Let me know how the bush tomato goes. They come up here naturally, but I’ve been a bit loath to eat them. I think when green they’re poisonous.

    The video is great. How do you hold the camera so steadily, especially while slow-panning. Will be great when you can add sound and we can learn about what we’re seeing. All so lush and green, too, esp. Sanctuary. Hope summer doesn’t take too much toll on it all. I imagine there is a cooling effect from having the river so close.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I think they are bitter when green, not sure if they are poisonous but I know that they usually let them ripen (if the birds don’t scoff them all!) and dehydrate them and use them that way. They are a big Aussie bush tucker foodie “thing” and I reckon you could use them like sundried tomatoes if you soaked them in oil. I doubt I will beat the birds to the ripe fruit but I am contemplating hacking off a limb and seeing if I can grow one from cuttings. It’s hardy enough. I have the camera on a tripod so that makes it a whole lot easier. If I was holding it you wouldn’t be able to make out what I was filming it would be shaking up and down so much πŸ˜‰ . It’s going to be a hot one here and the wicking fridge beds are going great guns. We are about to fill up the remaining beds with some bought in topsoil that I will mix with straw and compost and I am going to plant them out with lots of greens. I might have to buy another dog to patrol them though as the two that we have (who shall remain anonymous but they KNOW who they are! πŸ˜‰ ) are next to useless at keeping the feral animals off them. We are always a couple of degrees cooler here on the river than Launceston city. As we are just around the corner from the sea (if you look at the top of the map of Tassie where the Tamar River meets the sea you are almost looking at us!)

      The bush walks are lovely around here and even if I am sleep deprived and grumpy when I start out, I always arrive back home full of the wonder of nature and feeling very grateful to be alive and to live here πŸ™‚

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  3. foodnstuff says:

    I checked out your photo of the bush tomato again and I realise it is different to what I’ve got here. Flowers are very similar. Ours is Kangaroo Apple, Solanum laciniatum and it is poisonous when green. The bush tomato is another species, Solanum centrale, also called Desert Raisin and you are right, it is dried and eaten. I remember now, I sent for seed of it ages ago but it didn’t come up. Are you sure you’ve got the right one? If it’s growing naturally there, it’s right out of it’s range (Central Australia). Solanum aviculare is another related species and grows near the coast here. That’s poisonous when green too. If it’s growing locally there it’s more likely to be S. laciniatum or S. aviculare. Check them out. The leaves are quite different on the local species. The aborigines ate the fruit but treated it somehow first (maybe just waited till it was really ripe)

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    1. narf7 says:

      We have tonnes of kangaroo apples but this is very different. The leaves are grey, smaller and fuzzy. I am quite sure its a bush tomato and maybe someone is growing it in the near vicinity as a bush tucker species but the birds may have spread it? Not sure but I have been up close and personal with this little shrub for the last couple of years and it’s most definitely not a kangaroo apple

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  4. Linne says:

    LOVED the film, Narfie! Especially the slow pace; it gave me time to really look around and feel I saw everything. like the wee duckie . . . Wish I were familiar with the plants down your way; they all look good to me, ‘beneficial pest habitat’ and all. As a matter of fact, you will be pleased to know that I spotted NONE of the BP habitat. lol

    I really enjoyed the walk photos, too; it’s so nice to think of you enjoying another spring as we head into the dark tunnels of winter here. Although I love the indoor time, too; knitting and baking and all that. Wish i could pop in for a bit and maybe borrow some time at one of your spinning wheels. I haven’t done much spinning; took a class some decades ago. Still, it’s on my to-do list for maybe 2019. And perhaps I’ll be ultra-lucky and get some in during 2018.

    Hope to see more film of your place, maybe with you and/or Steve narrating?

    Love and Light to you both and to the boys. ~ Linne

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Thank you for your lovely comment Linne. I have 3 wheels now and as we have been so busy with our film course I haven’t had any time to spin. I am saving it for when the madness dies down and I can get some serious spinning time in. The garden is growing insanely at the moment because the weather is a lot warmer than average. Last year we only got 3 weeks of warmer weather but this year looks like bucking that trend and it’s going to be a warm one indeed. We are saving up to buy ourselves some sound equipment so that we can record our own sound which will mean that we can add sound to our videos. I truly hate my voice so you might end up getting Steve narrating ;). Love right back to you from us all Linne πŸ™‚

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  5. Bottle brush flowers! Thank you, you just solved a minor mystery for me. I’ve seen these periodically and have been enchanted by them, but had no clue what they were. Proper descriptions have eluded me so internet searches have turned up nothing useful. They’re so beautiful! It must be some magical place where such a plant is commonplace. Oh, and don’t get me started on those bush tomatoes… That’s not one I’ll expect to find in my daily travels.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Like Lemon Myrtle (a native Australian bush spice) and the Tasmanian pepper berry, the bush tomato is an Australian Aboriginal bush “tucker” (Aussie word for food). If you are interested, I could send you some Tasmanian pepper berries. They are very spicy and hot and fragrant. Let me know if you would like to try some. It would be my pleasure to send you some. They are a dried spice so it shouldn’t be hard to send them to you πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Oh my goodness, you are so incredibly generous to offer! I guess I shouldn’t be surprised, because you always are. Only if it’s not a hassle for you, of course! It would be a real treat to enjoy your rare Aussie delicacies; I have a feeling there’s no other way I could ever hope to taste those bush tomatoes in my lifetime.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. narf7 says:

        I will assemble a small care package of native Aussie bush spices for you so that you can try them. I will have to get an address for somewhere to send them but I will let you know when I have them ready to send. You will certainly be able to post some truly original recipes from them that’s for sure!

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      3. Incredible! I am once again floored by your kindness. Of course, absolutely no rush. Whenever you’re ready to collect that address, we can resume the conversation through email: hannah@mysweetvegan.com – I’m already dreaming of the recipe possibilities!

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      4. narf7 says:

        No problems. Off to assemble the weird Aussie ingredients πŸ™‚

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  6. Where do I start.. πŸ™‚ to tell you how I loved this post.
    So happy your little chick is thriving first of all, and So enjoyed your walk with Earl and thank you for the intro to your neighbour.
    So much going on in your garden.. Spring!! I am happy the weather is warming up at last..
    Now so enjoyed the Video and hardly recognised Steve with his beard lol.. Loved Earl..
    I showed hubby your video and it gives a greater sense of the expanse of it.. And the trees above..
    That View though across the bay.. Just stunning.
    Loved it LOVED it And LOVED it some more..
    Sending Hugs your way and Happy Gardening..
    We are off on Sat for our hols.. for a winter break.. So looking forward to just chilling and being waited on
    I have a post ready about the Dahlias for posting before we go..
    Sending Mega Hugs Fran.. Have fun with your filming.. And enjoy your weekend.. LOVE Sue xx ❀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Glad you liked it Sue ❀ Steve's dahlias that we planted out last year in Sanctuary are growing HUGE spikes so I can only begin to imagine how happy they are this year in the garden. We didn't have to lift the tubers as it doesn't get that cold here. Looking forward to your post about dahlias and I hope that you and your lovely husband have a brilliant holiday Sue. You have both earned it in triplicate. Sending huge hugs right back atcha and hoping that the weather stays nice for your holidays πŸ™‚

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  7. Jane says:

    Love what you have done here. Only short comment as I have internet and phone problems

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      No problems Jane. We get it. We are out in the sticks as well and often we are without the net for days on end. Hopefully yours gets sorted soon πŸ™‚

      Like

  8. Jane says:

    Well the internet seems to be back, but not the phone. Anyway I loved this blog as usual and the videos on YouTube. Thank you for showing Sanctuary I did so want to see it, so lush and green. It is all so beautiful and lucky dogs indeed to have such walks and paddles. You are so clever Fran, inventive in your garden and craft work and now a budding actress/film producer! I will be very interested in your apple experiments as I am going to take apple tree cuttings to grow on their own roots. My 7or 8year old apple seedling has 4 or 5 fruit for the first time this year. I do hope the cockies don’t take them all before I taste one. Also one apple tree that was here when I came also has fruit for the first time, just a couple. Well I’ll try and post this now, it’s a bit hit and miss at present.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      This property used to have a full reticulation system on it. The front acre was watered by an electronic automatic sprinkler system and water used to be free in Tasmania. When my dad and his partner bought the place about 30 years ago, and they started charging for water, they stopped watering. Our property is on a steep incline, is based on dry sclerophyll forest and nothing but sheoaks and poa grass grows at the top of the property it is so dry. In order to get this bit of lush greenery I have had to truly think outside the box. I collect mulch from anywhere that I can find it and hand watering is the go. I truly admire you Jane as I know that you have to bucket and pump water from your dam/s in order to get water to your garden. This property would be dry and dusty but for our ability to use town water. I know what it’s like to watch the possums and cockies eat everything that you have been hanging your hopes on. We have an unprotected walnut tree on the property. We have harvested walnuts from it once since we moved here. The black cockies found out about it and eat the walnuts green each year now. They have already started on the few peaches on the ancient peach tree but I never expect to harvest anything from that tree anyway so I wasn’t too crestfallen. I have plans to erect protective structures all around this area but funds escape me right now and the logistics are frankly terrifying but we found a way to fence off Sanctuary for next to nothing so I will never say “never” nowadays. This year is shaping up to be a hot one. We have already had a couple of 30C+ days which is completely out of the blue for Tassie. 30C days are extreme summer days and we aren’t even in summer yet. On the flip side, the veggies and the garden are going mental and we are experiencing the growing conditions that most of the rest of Australia gets each year so I am not complaining too much. I think you have to be inventive with how you do things or you give up and I refuse, point blank, to give up! If you want something bad enough, you just have to find a way to get it/achieve it and Permaculture has been my guiding light. Reusing, repurposing, replacing etc. and finding other ways than the norm to do things has allowed we penniless student hippies to affect a cure for our ailing property. I doubt that there is anything that Permaculture can’t make better to be honest. Living closely with nature has proven that to me time and time again. We just lost power and the net for an hour so I get where you are coming from with the intermittent power/phone thing. When we first moved here we were told by Telstra that we wouldn’t be able to get the internet! We refused to believe that and tried all kinds of net providers till we hit Dodo who told us that they could get us the net and we have been with them ever since. You just have to get your researching boots on and go and find out for yourself and don’t take the immediate stock answer for granted is my modus operandi these days.

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  9. Jane says:

    Yeah!!πŸ˜€πŸ˜€

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Jane says:

    Now what is weird is that the time on my iPad is correct, but the time given to my posts say am instead of pm

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I had the opposite. My tablet is telling me that it is an hour behind which tells me that it doesn’t automatically update for daylight savings which concurrently means that I won’t have to adjust it back again in April πŸ˜‰ Techology eh? πŸ˜‰

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  11. Jane says:

    I don’t pump water from the dam, I just bucket it. I only have a pump on the house tank. Sorry you are missing the rain. I can’t believe it’s raining. again here. My swales will be getting a good workout these last few days. We are also having really hot muggy days, we have also had very warm winter days once the frost melted in the mornings. I have taken a tip from the lush volunteer bed and planted summer stuff earlier than usual. My garden also is the best I’ve seen it and I haven’t watered much since winter. Knowing that you don’t give up and have worse growing conditions than me, keeps me going, also if they can grow in Jordan surely I can grow here. This summer will be interesting for me to see what effect the changes to my garden have made. Have you started your keyhole garden yet?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      I keep downloading articles about “Growing in the desert” and “Permaculture in the desert”. That’s where I got the idea to make fridge wicking beds because a lady in Arizona has made wicking beds out of all kinds of old things and it gave her the ability to grow food in the desert. I can’t wait to hear how your growing conditions and garden go this year. I think that both your property and ours have been affected by humid warmer weather so the garden will definitely get an earlier start. Here’s to productive gardening. I took some cuttings from a female kiwifruit this morning on Earl’s and my early morning walk. I had noticed it growing wild on the side of an old shed a few years ago but this year I saw that it had flowers on it so it’s a female! If I get enough cuttings to strike I will only have to buy a single male from Bunnings to supplement kiwifruit production and I plan on growing them all over the fencelines here as most native animals don’t like the fuzzy leaves and leave them alone. I haven’t started the keyhole garden yet. My lecturers keep pulling “We forgot…there’s one last set of questions for you to do…” out of the bag and I can’t wait to put this study year to rest and get full time back into the garden but I have loved the last week working from home. It’s been bliss and as soon as we start on the keyhole gardens I will post about it. Happy gardening my friend πŸ™‚

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  12. brymnsons says:

    Lovely Fran. Can you link me to the other videos you did please, on fb if that’s ok. I’ve got internet here (hurrah) and can watch them at my leisure :). It’s hotting up here and making it hard to go “out there”. If I can’t get my dogs out in the morning then I wait until late afternoon. Your garden is looking fantastic.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Thank you Kym ❀ Now I have a tiny bit of spare time to get out there and I am truly loving it. Like over there, it's getting hotter WAY earlier than usual here and we have had a solid week of high 20's and early 30's here and it doesn't look like slowing down. I will share the links to our other videos in a FB message πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Robbie says:

    I enjoyed the film! I could feel the breeze-LOL-aww, I was dreaming!. Everything is green:-) What pure joy. The final view towards the water, how you must love that every day!!!!! Your walking tour with photos was amazing. I wanted to blow them up to see the details of the other homes, lake, etc. Darn, I could not blow them up:-( The houses are set back from the road. You truly have to walk a bit to see a neighbor.
    .
    How neat that you chat with people along the way, collect plants from all over the area. You are truly blessed to be living where you do for just seeing your daily walk is a vacation-LOL

    I had a dried blowfish when I was a kid. I got it on a trip to Florida. I have no idea where it is now but I wonder how they got it dried all blown up-nuts. It was the size of a baseball with prickly, pointy things all around it. I assume it would hurt if touched!

    Always a joy to stop by and see you Fran…your garden is looking beautiful. I am getting ready for winter to come and will enjoy visiting and seeing your place. I can feel the breeze if I close my eyes!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. narf7 says:

      Can you feel the heat too Robbie? It’s about 30C here and rising at the moment and it’s not even summer yet! Apparently we have a cool change on the horizon but not before we get 32C tomorrow and very humid conditions. The plants in the garden think that they are in the Bahama’s and are growing exponentially. We are incredibly lucky to live where we live. Tasmania is a very pretty place and aside from the forestry, we are pretty well undisturbed here with a small population controlled by the lack of a job market here. I just got back from picking a couple of litres of strawberries from a friends place and getting some of their strawberry runners to plant out here. There is the promise of more strawberry runners (its a bit early in the season here for them yet) and some lupin seeds also. I gave them some pink English gooseberry plants that I grew from seed and a little walnut tree as I have nowhere to plant it and they have 50 acres. It’s lovely being part of the sharing economy isn’t it πŸ™‚ I am wafting the breeze and the heat over to you (Bezial is looking at me like I am crazy and Earl is off buying icecream with Steve for those strawberries for dessert tonight…yum!) I love winter but must admit to quite enjoying our recent spring πŸ™‚

      Like

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